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Bud Light River City Rockfest Announces Nine Inch Nails, Primus, Stone Temple Pilots, More

first_imgThe sixth annual Bud Light River City Rockfest will return to September 22 at the AT&T Center Grounds in San Antonio, Texas. The 2018 event will be headlined by Nine Inch Nails, marking the band’s fourth U.S. show of 2018, following three nights in Las Vegas, NV on June 13, 15, and 16 at The Joint at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. The complete lineup for Bud Light River City Rockfest features Primus, Stone Temple Pilots, Bush, Chevelle, Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, Clutch, Hellyeah, Clutch, Yelawolf, Suicidal Tendencies, The Sword, and more.Tickets go on sale today, April 30, at 12 p.m. CT. For more information, head to the event website.last_img

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Professor Robert R. Bowie dies at 104

first_imgRobert R. Bowie, the Clarence Dillon Professor of International Affairs Emeritus and founder and first director of the Center for International Affairs (now the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs) died Nov. 2 at the age of 104.Bowie’s career combined distinguished academic achievement with service at the highest levels of government.From 1946 to 1955, Bowie taught corporate and anti-trust law at Harvard Law School, with leaves of absence to serve as general counsel and special adviser to the U.S. high commissioner for Germany, John McCloy (1950-51), and as director of policy planning and assistant secretary of state under John Foster Dulles (1953-57). In this latter role he was a key figure in forging U.S. foreign policy during the Cold War.Returning to Harvard in 1957, Bowie became the first holder of the Clarence Dillon Professorship, named for the father of C. Douglas Dillon, treasury secretary under presidents Kennedy and Johnson.As founder and first director of the Center for International Affairs, Bowie presided over a distinguished group of scholars that included Edward Mason, Thomas Schelling, and Henry Kissinger. As director of the center, Bowie initiated a program to bring mid-career government officials from around the world to study at Harvard for a year, focusing on issues related to international affairs and foreign policy.Bowie directed the Center for International Affairs until 1972. In 1977, he returned to Washington to serve as deputy director for national intelligence at the Central Intelligence Agency, a position he held until 1979. He retired from Harvard in 1980.Born in Baltimore, Md., in 1909, Bowie earned an A.B. degree from Princeton in 1931 and an LL.B. from Harvard Law School in 1934. Bowie practiced law in Baltimore until 1942, when he joined the U.S. Army with the rank of captain. After the war, he became special assistant to General Lucius Clay, the deputy military governor for Germany, a post he held until 1946. On his 100th birthday the Federal Republic of Germany presented him with the Commander’s Cross of the Order of Merit for his work on Germany’s post-war integration in the West, Franco-German reconciliation, European integration, and German unification.His books include “Studies in Federalism” (1954); “Arms Control and United States Foreign Policy” (1961); “Shaping the Future: Foreign Policy in an Age of Transition” (1964); “Suez 1956” (1974); and “Waging Peace: How Eisenhower Shaped an Enduring Cold War Strategy” (1998). Through the mid-1980s, Bowie wrote a regular column on foreign policy for the Christian Science Monitor.Bowie was predeceased by his wife of 62 years, Mary Theodosia Chapman Bowie, and is survived by two sons, Robert Jr. of Monkton, Md., and William Chapman of Springfield, Mass., and three grandchildren, Alice, Robert, and Peter.In 1997, the Bowies moved to Blakehurst in Towson, Md., and were cared for in their final years by the staff at Chestnut Green. Funeral services will be held for family and friends Dec. 7 at 11 a.m. at the Old Wye Church in Wye Mills, Md.last_img read more

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How politicians practice ‘racial distancing’ with communities of color

first_img Panel discusses long-festering wounds of racial inequities and possible steps forward How racial issues can be fairly framed Many politicians find themselves walking a fine line when it comes to talking about the African American community, LaFleur Stephens-Dougan, Princeton University assistant professor of politics, says. They want to simultaneously voice their support for policies, positions, and attitudes widely held by African American voters without alienating white supporters, a rhetorical strategy she refers to as “racial distancing.”Stephens-Dougan, a former Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellow at the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, researches the subtle, often surprising ways that racial appeals come into political speech. She shared those insights in a Monday talk sponsored by the Hutchins Center. The talk shared its title with her recent book, “Race to the Bottom: How Racial Appeals Work in American Politics.”Moderated by Davin L. Phoenix, assistant professor of political science at the University of California-Irvine, her talk gave a perspective that went beyond the Trump era. She noted that President Trump has made plenty of racial appeals in his own speeches, both explicitly (denouncing Mexican immigrants as rapists in his 2016 campaign) and implicitly (warning suburban housewives this year that “low-income housing” would invade their neighborhoods). Yet, she said, “The landscape is even wider in terms of who uses racial appeals, and why they are effective.”And she noted that such appeals have been used in the past by Republicans and Democrats alike.Reading from her book, Stephens-Dougan referred to a pivotal moment in recent racial history: the west Baltimore protests that broke out in 2015 when a Black man, Freddie Gray, was fatally injured while in police custody. The ensuing riots, she said, “placed a national spotlight on race, justice, police brutality, and the distrust between African American communities and their local government. The nation was looking to the first Black president to address the racial tension. How would [President Obama] respond?”LaFleur Stephens-Dougan said that African American politicians, like the one pictured here with the Confederate flag, are not immune from the pressures of appeasing their constituents.The answer was that Obama’s responses tended to be extremely tempered: He denounced racism while also sympathizing with police and assailing acts by protesters that seemed violent or destructive. “The resulting fallout was usually that Obama was criticized in conservative circles for being anti-police, while he was criticized in liberal circles for being far too silent on an issue that disproportionately affected African Americans.” Obama would eventually denounce rioters as “criminals and thugs” who damaged their own communities.This marked a major shift in Obama’s rhetoric, Stephens-Dougan said: His use of the racially-charged word “thugs” was shared by the city’s Democratic, African American mayor, Stephanie Rawlings-Blake (who later walked it back), and by the state’s white Republican governor, Larry Hogan.“All three politicians were united in their use of racially inflammatory language despite the diversity of their racial and political backgrounds,” she said. And she noted that all three were criticized for it — notably by Baltimore City Councilor Carl Stokes, who said that “thug” was “a euphemism for the N-word.”In 2015, President Obama and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake used the racially-charged word “thugs” when describing the protesters in the Baltimore riots.Yet, she said, use of the word served a purpose for both sides: “Hogan was reinforcing his party’s reputation for being tough on crime, while Obama and Rawlings-Blake were distancing themselves from their party’s reputation for being soft on crime.” Just as importantly, the latter two were also eschewing any racial allegiance with the mostly Black protesters. This, she said, was an example of “racial distancing,” which she characterized as “the phenomenon whereby politicians convey to racially moderate and to racially conservative whites that they will not disrupt the racial status quo.”In majority white jurisdictions, she said, political candidates have an incentive to show that they will not “cater to Black interests,” but they must also show that they are not racially insensitive. As a result, she said, Democratic and African American politicians are increasingly talking about race in a manner that distances them from a racially liberal agenda.This sort of “racial distancing” is meant to challenge the stereotype that these politicians are beholden to a particular minority. This played out most recently in the last election, when Democrats balanced their outreach to communities of color with “trying to get that elusive white American swing voter who might have switched from Obama to Trump in 2016.” One example would be the use of coded racial terms, like “urban” or “inner-city,” over explicit ones. Responding to one of Phoenix‘s questions, Stephens-Dougan noted that the racial unrest of the past summer may mark a turning point away from softer, racially distanced messages. “I’d argue that this year that we’ve seen a racial reckoning that’s made it more difficult for Democratic candidates in particular to engage in racial distancing. There is a groundswell among young people against anything that is seen as perpetrating racism. So Democrats are more constrained in some ways. We see this borne out in the Joe Biden campaign, where there was a lot of push for him to have an African American running mate, even if that might be largely symbolic.” Still, she said, Biden has had to maintain a balance — “admitting that systemic racism is a thing, while being clear that he is not especially liberal.”An audience member asked what she made of Trump’s apparently increased appeal to Black and Hispanic men in the past election. She responded that sexism may be part of the answer: “The type of messaging that Trump has engaged in might appeal to a non-trivial fraction of men of color in terms of this idea of protecting womanhood and the other gendered tropes that he has engaged in.” At the same time, she said, Trump at least made his racial messages more implicit. “We know what he’s talking about what he says ‘suburban housewives’ and ‘low-income voters,’ but at least he didn’t come out and say it.” What to keep Related Reassessing public art in Europe in light of increased racial awareness Media experts tackle bigger picture in reporting recent news events Racism, coronavirus, and African Americanslast_img read more

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Leahy says center for an agricultural economy’s new Food Venture Center is ‘model of agricultural innovation’

first_imgDuring an open house and ribbon cutting ceremony at the Vermont Food Venture Center (VFVC) in Hardwick Friday afternoon, Senator Patrick Leahy (D) called the nonprofit multipurpose kitchen incubator and food processing facility a critical piece of infrastructure that will help enable Vermont’s agricultural renaissance. The center gives Vermont’s producers and entrepreneurs new tools to convert crops and dairy products into value-added foods, from inception to product launch — and including advice and technical assistance for prospective start-up businesses.The Vermont Food Venture Center — operated by the Center for an Agricultural Economy (CAE) and built through a partnership between the Northeastern Vermont Development Association (NVDA) and the nonprofit Northern Enterprises — has been quietly operating for several months and officially began soliciting new clients this summer.The Center for an Agricultural Economy calls the VFVC a one-of-a-kind facility located in a thriving region that celebrates food, farm and local economy. The 15,000 square-foot food processing facility and kitchen incubator has one long-term anchor tenant, the Cellars of Jasper Hill which will be mentoring new cheese makers and producing cheese. The facility is available for hourly or contract lease to people interested in making commercial quality recipes or processing agricultural products.‘The Vermont Food Venture Center is a model for farmers and economic development professionals across the state and a generator of agricultural innovation,’ said Leahy, who secured $450,000 in federal funding for the development of the facility. ‘Northern Enterprises and the Northeastern Vermont Development Association have built an incubator kitchen and food processing facility that will give Vermonters the tools necessary to convert crops to value-added food, milk into value-added cheese, and perhaps mom’s old recipes into thriving businesses. Just as importantly, staff from the Center for an Agricultural Economy can provide the secret ingredient — advice and other types of technical assistance that can help a food entrepreneur make good use of the facility. This is a meaningful and practical advance for value-added agriculture in Vermont.’Monty Fischer, Executive Director of the CAE, said, ‘We are proud and excited that the VFVC is opening in Hardwick. This facility will provide a critical piece of infrastructure for Vermont’s food system, small businesses and the agricultural economy.’Steve Patterson, Executive Director of NVDA, said, ‘This grand opening represents the culmination of five years of concerted efforts from multiple stakeholders. The success of this facility will set a shining example for value added food production throughout the state.’Vermont Secretary of Agriculture Chuck Ross said, ‘The Vermont Food Venture Center is an incredible resource to help incubate and support the agricultural businesses in this region and may serve as a model for other areas within Vermont and beyond. The opportunities created here will stimulate the kind of community-based agriculture that makes Vermont special. The Governor and Agency of Agriculture believe this will help support the ongoing renaissance of agriculture in Vermont. Leadership at the federal level led by Senator Leahy coupled with state and community commitments make partnerships like the Vermont Food Venture Center successful and enrich the agricultural and community based economy of Vermont.’Leahy helped establish the original Vermont Food Venture Center in Fairfax in 1996. The needs of agricultural producers and food entrepreneurs from across the state soon dictated the need for a larger facility.Since 2007, Northern Enterprises, a nonprofit organization that ran the original Vermont Food Venture Center, pieced together more than $3 million in federal and state funding to build the new facility. Funding included the $450,000 secured by Leahy, a $500,000 United States Department of Agriculture Rural Business Enterprise Grant, a $1.5 million federal Economic Development Administration American Recovery and Reinvestment Act grant, a $800,000 Vermont Community Development Program grant to the Town of Hardwick, and various other grants including appropriations from the Vermont State Legislature secured in part by Vermont State Senator Vince Illuzi (R-Essex and Orleans).USDA Rural Development Vermont/New Hampshire State Director Molly Lambert said, ‘USDA Rural Development invested in this project because we believe it will give farmers and rural Vermonters additional tools to start or expand their food-based businesses. It has the potential to create jobs and increase economic opportunity in rural Vermont.’ Lambert noted that the $500,000 Rural Business Enterprise Grant her agency awarded to the project was given special consideration due to its location within the Rural Economic Area Partnership Zone secured by Leahy in 2001.Vermont Secretary of Commerce Lawrence Miller said, ‘This is a tremendous example of the economic development opportunities to be found in our critical agricultural sector. This is a major area of focus in our work and evidence of what we can accomplish when people like Senator Leahy and the local partners work to align federal, state and local partners. The Hardwick agricultural renaissance is getting noticed around the country, and I particularly want to commend the town of Hardwick and NVDA on their active participation in the Community Development Block Grant for an outstanding project that will benefit the whole region.’HARDWICK, Vt. (FRIDAY, Jan. 6)last_img read more

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BRO Athletes | John Anderson on Why the Trail Ultra is the New Marathon

first_imgYears ago, my brother convinced me to run a marathon with him. “That would be stupid!” was my first response to his pressuring. I couldn’t fathom running 10 miles, let alone 26.2. I just assumed people who did that sort of thing had superhuman talent and endurance, and having a newborn baby in our house, I couldn’t see myself being one of those people anytime soon. Never!, I convinced myself.Also, as the stress and responsibility of life increased, I grew hungry for a new release and like many, a seemingly ridiculous endurance challenge seemed like just the right thing to get my mind and body back on track. So I eventually caved in, flubbed through a haphazard training “plan”, and ran my first marathon. I haven’t been the same since (in a good way!).My brother, however, did a good job keeping up the pressure and pestering, and slowly my outlook changed. Turns out, its easy to get out of shape after having a child. Finding a new routine with a little one (or new job, new home, etc.) often involves letting your own fitness slip. Next month, was my new fitness mantra.This story likely has something in common with many people’s reasoning for tackling the marathon: Jumpstarting life with a new fitness goal. Tackling something that seems impossible. Sharing in the camaraderie of it all…But why the marathon? What is it about 26.2 miles that gets hundreds of thousands of people off the couch and out of their comfort zones each year?The road marathon has earned its reputation as the pinnacle of endurance events because… it’s HARD! Whether you’re fast or slow, talented or not, you have to EARN the marathon through months of training. Running a marathon takes dedication, commitment, and perseverance long before the race even begins. One favorite running quote by Susan Sidoriak says: “I dare you to train for a marathon and not have it change your life”.For those of you who have never run a marathon, the thought of running an ultramarathon simply seems absurd. For those of you who have run marathons, the thought of taking one more step past 26.2 is enough to make your calves cramp just thinking about it. However, as a guy with experience on both sides of the coin, I’m going to make an argument for why trail ultras are easier, more fun, and require less recovery. Essentially, I’m gonna tell you why the trail ultra is the next “marathon”, and why that‘s a good thing!  [By definition, an ultramarathon is anything over 26.2, but you’ll find the most common entry-level ultra is the 50K (31-ish miles), followed by the 50-miler, the 100K (62-ish miles), and finally the 100-miler.]But what if there was a better way?! We marathon runners do so because we want this type of challenge and change in our lives. No, we need the challenge and change! Well ladies and gentlemen, there is a new “marathon” in town and its here to stay… May I introduce: the trail ultramarathon!Marathons are hard and grueling. Ultras are hard and grueling, but in a wonderful kind of way!I can recall Mile 20 of the Marine Corps Marathon. You’ve just left the crowds and beauty of the National Mall and you get spit out onto the 14th Street Bridge, which is really just a huge concrete highway taking you over the Potomac River.   You’re at mile 20, so you’re entering the really tough mental part of the race because your legs are starting to die, and here you are running on some barren, miserable concrete super structure. Ugh. To add insult to injury, just a few miles later you’ll be running through the Pentagon parking lot…Preist Now I’ll compare this to Mile 26 of the Promise Land 50K. At this point, your legs are dead, you’ve got 8 miles to go, and you start a grueling, steep, 3-mile climb up Apple Orchard Falls. “Running” is not really an option here, even the lead runners are “power-hiking” the steep falls trail. But as you wallow in your physical defeat, you are literally hiking up a majestic waterfall – climbing over boulders, getting sprayed by waterfall mist, and being treated to sweeping scenic views of the valley below.In every ultra I have run, I have been extremely tired and wiped with miles to go, yet I have always found it in me to enjoy being out in the woods, on the trail, appreciating the beautiful nature around me… even though my legs are dying.Marathons typically have thousands of runners. A big ultra has 400 runners.MarineCorpsMarathon20061Marathon training is often a grind, Ultra training rocks!Ok, this is clearly personal preference, but the smaller field in ultramarathons makes for a very intimate and friendly racing experience. One of my favorite things about ultramarathons is that they are like big parties with new and old friends. There is a lot of fun to be had before, during, and after the race. Even top competitors often gab and joke and encourage each other during races, which is really more a reflection of how tight the ultrarunning community is. If you run just one ultra in an area, you quickly become fast friends with a surprising number of people that you are likely to see again at any other ultra within your state. Now I’m not going to say that marathon runners are not friendly – the majority of runners I know are friendly, great people – road or trail. However, the vibe at these larger marathon events is decidedly less personal. Trying to strike up conversation with a random runner in the middle of a large marathon is often met with much resistance. But strike up conversation with someone in an ultra, and 2 hours later you know their life story, they know yours, and you’re planning a “run-cation” together.MMTRleavesrunningsmallMarathon training involves grueling long runs on roads with routes designed mostly to get in the necessary mileage. It’s all about the mileage and the pace. And for some reason, walking and taking rest breaks are often culturally frowned upon. Also, running on roads is an extremely repetitive motion and the rate of repetitive stress injuries is very high in marathon training.Pay no attention to pace, only effort. We wait for each other at trail intersections and often plan snack breaks at points of interest such as a summit or swimming hole. Also, you are immersed in nature, spending hours in the peace of the trail vs. out on the open road. Last, with long trail runs you are constantly changing up your foot strike and body position to adapt to the uneven terrain and elevation gain/loss. Because you are using so many different muscles, the repetitive stress is greatly reduced. Yes, you still have to train your legs to the rigors of the trail, but you will be stronger and less prone to repetitive stress injury.Ultra training long runs happen on the trail. These tend to be slower-paced efforts with friends, taking breaks for selfies and photos of the scenery.Ultras have a “finish” mindset vs. a standardized time mindset that marathons have.Whether your marathon is in California or in Virginia, a 3:30 marathon is pretty much a 3:30 marathon. When we set ourselves up to run road marathons, we are quickly categorizing our efforts and comparing them to the nation of people who are faster or slower than us.HellgatebethelWith ultras, your finishing time has nothing to do with the distance, but everything to do with the course, and the focus tends to be on just finishing. 50K races may take the same runner anywhere from 3 ½ hours to 6 hours, depending on the terrain of the course. The longer 50 and 100 milers will vary even greater depending on terrain, altitude, etc. Thus, specific time goals become unimportant for most ultrarunners, which then allows them to focus more on running by effort and “feel” throughout the day. Being freed from paying attention to a specific pace allows a better sense of listening to our bodies and adjusting naturally to the trail and the day’s demands.Marathons are mostly on roads, in cities. Ultras are typically on trails, in the mountains/recreational areas.Ultra training is not necessarily any more training than for marathon training – its just different.For the most part, you do not need to run any more mileage when training for an ultra than you do when training for a marathon. In fact, to be perfectly clear, you do not need to have ever run a marathon before tackling an ultra! You can do a 50k on 30 miles a week (though more would be better..), you just need to make sure you get in some race-specific training. Running a mountain trail ultra?…Better train on some mountain trails to get your legs adapted. Most ultrarunners get in at least half of their miles on the roads anyway, and many do track workouts and tempo runs to work on their speed.Roads have cars, asphalt, and buildings. Trails have forests, streams, and wildlife. Also at marathons, especially larger marathons, it is often difficult to hang out at the finish line. Many times you are whisked away to keep the area from getting congested and you may find yourself eating a post-race snack sitting on a curb at a closed off intersection. Most ultras finish at a park or recreational area where there is ample space to grab a chair or a picnic table and hang out right at the finish line, watching old and new friends complete their day. Getting to watch the last finisher is a treat and it is always amazing to me how many people specifically stay to see the last finisher at an ultra cross the line.Long runs on trails do require a bit more time however. Whereas a 20-mile marathon training run on the road may take someone 3 ½ hours, that same run in the mountains may take 4 ½ – 5 hours because of the terrain and elevation gain.Most marathon runners I talk to generally underfuel, and limit themselves to gels, water, and maybe sports drink, which is typically what is offered at the races.Also, you need to learn to eat for ultras. When you are out there for 5, 12, or 24 hours, you have to eat while running or your day will be a disaster. This is figured out on the long training runs. My training partners and I will typically bring PB&J sandwiches, snickers bars, and cookies on long runs, along with the typical gels, bars, and sports drink. Eating on the run is an important skill in ultrarunning but also part of the fun of training!You never know what your ultrarunning friends are going to pull out of their packs on a training run or even in races, which tend to be stocked with all of the above plus sodas, candy, and more!Marathons give you medals. Ultras give you sweet swag.HM3A9615Now some marathons do step it up and give out a nice finishers shirt or hat, but that medal (that you’re paying for) usually goes right into a box somewhere in your home. Ultras tend to give good swag like premier Patagonia/Mountain Hardwear finishers shirts, coffee mugs, running shorts, trucker hats, etc. The ultra culture essentially comes with ultra swag that you can wear proudly and use regularly after the race. Show up to work Monday morning with your marathon medal on and people will start talking. Show up with your Terrapin Mountain 50k coffee mug and your Patagonia finisher’s shirt on and people will start gawking!Training for and running ultramarathons has taught me more about myself than any other endeavor I have participated in, and has given me a stronger passion and confidence in life. Ultramarathon running is growing at an exponential rate in the US for all of the above reasons. So if you’re interested, don’t be afraid or intimidated. Ask around, find a friend, and sign up for one! But I will give one warning: you many never run a road marathon again..[divider]More From our BRO Athletes Here[/divider]last_img read more

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Uruguayan Defense Minister Creates National Computer Security Incident Response Center

first_img Uruguay ranks high on Global Cybersecurity Index By Dialogo March 09, 2015 For example, priorities would include the centers for command and control of the Navy, shipping lines, and airports. CERTUY was created through a decree signed by former president José Mujica (who left office March 1 and was succeeded by President Tabaré Vázquez), and Defense Minister Eleuterio Fernández Huidobro “with the task of preventing, treating, and managing cybersecurity incidents that may arise in the context of national security,” according to a January 27 press release from the Office of the President of Uruguay. The new organization will work with all of the country’s institutions in all areas related to the Ministry of Defense and it will coordinate all activities related to the management of cyber incidents, explained Roberto Ambrosini, co-director of the Cyber-Security Course at the Center for Higher National Studies at the Defense College of Uruguay. Proactive and reactive services will be offered In the first half of 2014, there were 306 cybersecurity incidents in Uruguay. Incidents are defined as any attempt, successful or not, to carry out an information technology attack, according to CERTUY. In the first half of 2014, there were 306 cybersecurity incidents in Uruguay. Incidents are defined as any attempt, successful or not, to carry out an information technology attack, according to CERTUY. In addition to developing capabilities for the early detection and prevention of computer security incidents, the new unit will “effectively and efficiently” respond to IT incidents involving critical infrastructure and essential services, according to the Office of the President. For example, priorities would include the centers for command and control of the Navy, shipping lines, and airports. According to Ambrosini, “both at the national and international levels, the center is well-regarded. It has been working with response teams from the OAS [Organization of American States] and the CERTUY for some time. What has happened has been a formalization of the issue.” “This is an issue that also goes beyond national boundaries and exposes us to global actions. The world is globalized and full of uncertainty. We have to work on developing strategic intelligence,” Menéndez added. The personnel at the response center will specialize in different areas of cyber-defense. “There are differences in what you need to know to prevent an attack on the financial system and what you need to know to prevent an attack on the country’s radars,” AGESIC Executive Director José Clastornik said, according to news daily El Observador on January 31. “The increase in incident detection year after year is due to the implementation of new detection systems, which contribute to active responses,” the CERTUY website reports. “This is an issue that also goes beyond national boundaries and exposes us to global actions. The world is globalized and full of uncertainty. We have to work on developing strategic intelligence,” Menéndez added. The Defense Minister of Uruguay is preparing to strengthen the country against cyber attacks by creating the National Computer Security Incident Response Center (CERTUY). The cyber-defense team will classify incidents based on their level of importance and impact on the functionality of the state, according to Ambrosini. In the case of multiple incidents, CERTUY must decide which is the most important, in order to devote more resources. The cybersecurity area is composed of three main branches: technical, technological, and the generation of policies and procedures for managing security, according to Ambrosini. Proactive services include researching, developing, and maintaining policies, standards, procedures, techniques, tools, and best practices that improve information security. Reactive services include providing technical and logistical support in order to mitigate the impact of cybersecurity incidents, coordinating the incident response initiatives, and providing centralized reporting regarding all security incidents on record. There are also plans to integrate and exchange computer security knowledge with educational institutions. The Global Cybersecurity Index released in December 2014 by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) ranks Uruguay eighth in the world in cybersecurty capabilities, according to a CERTUY press release issued on December 26, 2014. The center aims to protect everything from databases to the country’s satellites. It also will work with domestic and international organizations to strengthen the security of Uruguay’s information technology. Reactive services include providing technical and logistical support in order to mitigate the impact of cybersecurity incidents, coordinating the incident response initiatives, and providing centralized reporting regarding all security incidents on record. There are also plans to integrate and exchange computer security knowledge with educational institutions. “Following the line traced by all response teams, we expect to be successful, but keep a humble attitude in order to learn from others and a willingness to collaborate to respond to cyber-incidents and resolve them as quickly as possible.” The Defense Minister of Uruguay is preparing to strengthen the country against cyber attacks by creating the National Computer Security Incident Response Center (CERTUY). The work will be done in coordination with CERTUY, under the Electronic Government Development Agency (AGESIC), which is part of the Executive Branch. According to Ambrosini, “both at the national and international levels, the center is well-regarded. It has been working with response teams from the OAS [Organization of American States] and the CERTUY for some time. What has happened has been a formalization of the issue.” The center aims to protect everything from databases to the country’s satellites. It also will work with domestic and international organizations to strengthen the security of Uruguay’s information technology. The work will be done in coordination with CERTUY, under the Electronic Government Development Agency (AGESIC), which is part of the Executive Branch. Critical infrastructures and essential services are priorities The new organization will work with all of the country’s institutions in all areas related to the Ministry of Defense and it will coordinate all activities related to the management of cyber incidents, explained Roberto Ambrosini, co-director of the Cyber-Security Course at the Center for Higher National Studies at the Defense College of Uruguay. Critical infrastructures and essential services are priorities CERTUY was created through a decree signed by former president José Mujica (who left office March 1 and was succeeded by President Tabaré Vázquez), and Defense Minister Eleuterio Fernández Huidobro “with the task of preventing, treating, and managing cybersecurity incidents that may arise in the context of national security,” according to a January 27 press release from the Office of the President of Uruguay. Proactive and reactive services will be offered The cybersecurity area is composed of three main branches: technical, technological, and the generation of policies and procedures for managing security, according to Ambrosini. The center will provide other proactive services including the periodic analysis of the risks associated with information assets, the training of the response team members and their designated supervisors, and collaboration with other centers and response teams at the national and international levels to address cybersecurity incidents. “We have been working for years on the issue because advances in technology create some vulnerabilities. The objectives are to mitigate, prepare for, and manage all of the characteristics of cybercrimes in the area of Defense,” said Undersecretary of the Ministry of Defense Jorge Menéndez, according to news daily El Espectador on February 6. The response center will provide both proactive and reactive services. Proactive services include researching, developing, and maintaining policies, standards, procedures, techniques, tools, and best practices that improve information security. The response center will provide both proactive and reactive services. The center will provide other proactive services including the periodic analysis of the risks associated with information assets, the training of the response team members and their designated supervisors, and collaboration with other centers and response teams at the national and international levels to address cybersecurity incidents. The cyber-defense team will classify incidents based on their level of importance and impact on the functionality of the state, according to Ambrosini. In the case of multiple incidents, CERTUY must decide which is the most important, in order to devote more resources. The Global Cybersecurity Index released in December 2014 by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) ranks Uruguay eighth in the world in cybersecurty capabilities, according to a CERTUY press release issued on December 26, 2014. Uruguay ranks high on Global Cybersecurity Index In addition to developing capabilities for the early detection and prevention of computer security incidents, the new unit will “effectively and efficiently” respond to IT incidents involving critical infrastructure and essential services, according to the Office of the President. “We have been working for years on the issue because advances in technology create some vulnerabilities. The objectives are to mitigate, prepare for, and manage all of the characteristics of cybercrimes in the area of Defense,” said Undersecretary of the Ministry of Defense Jorge Menéndez, according to news daily El Espectador on February 6. “The increase in incident detection year after year is due to the implementation of new detection systems, which contribute to active responses,” the CERTUY website reports. “Following the line traced by all response teams, we expect to be successful, but keep a humble attitude in order to learn from others and a willingness to collaborate to respond to cyber-incidents and resolve them as quickly as possible.” The personnel at the response center will specialize in different areas of cyber-defense. “There are differences in what you need to know to prevent an attack on the financial system and what you need to know to prevent an attack on the country’s radars,” AGESIC Executive Director José Clastornik said, according to news daily El Observador on January 31. last_img read more

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March 1, 2004 On the Move

first_img Michael Pike, Robert Gregg, and Gregg Rivkind have become associated with Ruden, McClosky, Smith, Schuster & Russell, P.A. Pike, formerly of Broad & Cassell in West Palm Beach, focuses in commercial litigation, including securities and health law litigation. He is in the West Palm Beach office at 222 Lakeview Ave. Gregg, previously of Allen Norton & Blue in Coral Gables, concentrates in general civil litigation and employment law litigation. Rivkind, formerly of Arthur Andersen in Miami, practices in federal and state income tax, international tax, estate and gift tax planning, state corporate and partnership law, and tax litigation. Gregg and Rivkind are in the Ft. Lauderdale office at 200 E. Broward Blvd. Brenda B. Ezell, formerly associated with Rogers Towers, has been appointed an assistant general counsel with the Office of General Counsel for the City of Jacksonville, and works in the land use and environmental law department. She can be reached at (904) 630-1722, or at BEzell@coj.net. Steven H. Denman has become a shareholder of Abel Band. Denman concentrates in utilities regulation, energy, telecommunications, and transportation law. Offices are located at 240 S. Pineapple Ave., Sarasota, 34236. Andres Rojas, formerly associated with Foley & Lardner, P.A., has been appointed an assistant general counsel with the Office of General Counsel for the City of Jacksonville, and works in the general litigation department. He can be reached at 904-630-3671 or at ARojas@coj.net. Keith H. Hagman has become a partner of Pavese Law Firm in Ft. Myers. He concentrates in real property litigation, construction litigation, lien law, condominium law and real estate law. Brian K. Duffey, formerly of Duffey & Duffey, has joined Hodgson Russ in Boca Raton. Duffey concentrates in estate planning, probate, and real estate. David S. Harrigan and Jonathan E. Rose have become associated with Stump, Storey, Callahan, Dietrich & Spears, P.A. Harrigan and Rose have joined the firm’s civil litigation practice. Offices are located at 37 N. Orange Ave., Ste. 200, Orlando, 32801, phone: (407) 425-2571.Roberts, Reynolds & Bedard, P.A., announces that Gerard A. Tuzzio has become a shareholder and that the firm name has changed to Roberts, Reynolds, Bedard & Tuzzio, P.A., with offices at 470 Columbia Dr., Bldg. C-101, West Palm Beach, 33409, phone: (561) 688-6560. Rachel E Adams has become associated with Stovash, Case & Tingley, P.A. Offices are located at Signature Plaza, 201 S. Orange Ave., Ste. 720, Orlando, 32801, phone: (407)316-0393. Susan L. Fara has become a shareholder of Brown, DeMay & Froman, P.A. Fara concentrates in workers’ compensation defense and workers’ compensation appellate law. Offices are located at Sarasota City Center, Ste. 1100, 1819 Main St., Sarasota, 34236, phone: (941) 957-3800, fax: (941) 957-3888. Marc A. Chambers, formerly of Davis, Polk & Wardell in New York City, has become a senior associate with Glenn Rasmussen Fogarty & Hooker, P.A. Chambers concentrates in corporate law, securities offerings and regulation, and mergers and acquisitions. Offices are located at 100 S. Ashley Dr., Ste. 1300, Tampa, 33602. John M. Compton has become a shareholder of Norton, Hammersley, Lopez & Skokos, P.A., in Sarasota. Compton concentrates in taxation, corporate, estate planning, and probate. Mark M. Wall, formerly of Englander & Fischer, P.A., has become associated with Hill, Ward & Henderson, P.A., in Tampa. He focuses in commercial and real estate related litigation. Offices are located at 101 E. Kennedy Blvd., Ste. 3700, Tampa, 33602. Michael Larkin has become partner of Bercow & Radell, P.A., with offices at 200 S. Biscayne Blvd., Ste. 850, Miami, phone:(305) 374-5300. Larkin concentrates in land use and zoning matters in Miami-Dade County, Miami Beach, Aventura, Hialeah Gardens, Sweetwater, Miami Gardens, North Bay Village, and Key Biscayne. Judith A. Guthrie has become associated with Marks Gray, P.A. Guthrie concentrates in healthcare law, medical malpractice, and nursing home defense. Offices are located at 1200 Riverplace Blvd., Ste. 800, Jacksonville, 32207. Edward F. Gagain III and Dale T. Golden have been elected shareholders of Marshall, Dennehy, Warner, Coleman & Goggin in Tampa. Gagain concentrates in general liability. Golden focuses in professional liability. www.marshalldennehey.com. Stephanie B. Preston has become a shareholder of Fisher, Rushmer, Werrenrath, Dickson, Talley & Dunlap, P.A. Offices are located at 20 N. Orange Ave., Orlando, 32802, phone: (407) 843-2111, fax: (407) 422-1080. John E. Thomas has become a shareholder with Gardner, Wilkes, Shaheen & Candelora. Thomas focuses in commercial litigation, election law, and medical malpractice. Offices are located at 2400 SunTrust Financial Centre, 401 E. Jackson St., Tampa, 33602. Asima M. Azam has become associated with Divine & Estes, P.A., with offices at 24 S. Orange Ave., Ste. 203, Orlando, 32802, phone: (407) 426-9500, fax: (407) 426-8030. Maureen Daughton, Kelly O’Keefe, and Charles Geitner have become partners with Broad and Cassel. Daughton and O’Keefe are both with the Tallahassee office. Daughton is a member of the firm’s labor and employment practice group, and O’Keefe is a member of the firm’s appellate, labor and employment, and commercial litigation practice groups. Geitner concentrates in commercial litigation and is in the Tampa office. John J. Fumero, formerly general counsel for South Florida Water Management District, has become a senior attorney with Lewis, Longman & Walker, P.A. Fumero concentrates in environmental, land use, administrative and water policy law matters. Offices are located at 1700 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Ste. 1000, West Palm Beach, 33401. Joseph T. King has become associated with Williams Schifino & Mangione & Steady, P.A. King concentrates in securities litigation, arbitration, business litigation, and trial practice. Offices are located at One Tampa City Center, Ste. 2600, Tampa, 33602, phone: (813) 221-2626, fax: (813) 221-7335. Charles J. Meltz has become a partner of Grower, Ketcham, Rutherford , Bronson, Eide & Telan, P.A. He concentrates in medical malpractice defense and account malpractice defense. Offices are located at 390 N. Orange Ave., Ste. 1900, Orlando, 32801, phone: (407) 423-9545. Andrew S. Alitowski announces the opening of his practice, concentrating in personal injury matters, general civil litigation, and real estate transactions, with offices at 305 Broadway, Ste. 1101, New York, N.Y., 10007, phone: (212) 227-2320. Gregory P. Brown and Scott W. Dibbs have become shareholders with Hill, Ward and Henderson, P.A. Brown practices in civil trial work, business bankruptcy, and creditors’ rights litigation. Dibbs concentrates in both corporate and real estate matters. Offices are located at 101 E. Kennedy Blvd., Ste. 3700, Tampa, 33602. Edward M. Whelan has become a partner with McGuireWoods. Whelan concentrates in construction related matters. Offices are located at Bank of America Tower, 50 N. Laura St., Ste. 3300, Jacksonville, 32202. Stephanie Williams, formerly of Ausley & McMullen in Tallahassee , has become associate dean for administration at the Florida State University College of Law. Albert M. Rodriguez has become associated with McCumber, Inclan, Daniels, Valdez, Buntz & Ferrera, P.A., in Tampa, with offices at 5102 S. Laurel St., Ste. 100, Tampa, 33607, phone: (813) 287-2822. Rodriguez concentrates in nursing home, medical malpractice, and general liability defense. Kimberly G. Jackson has become associated Abbey, Adams, Byelick, Kiernan, Mueller & Lancaster in St. Petersburg and Tampa. The firm concentrates in the defense areas of liability, malpractice, workers’ compensation, employment claims and appeals. Hugh J. Turner, Jr., formely of Smathers & Thompson Kelley Drye & Warren, English, McCaughan & O’Bryan and Redgrave & Turner, has become a shareholder with Akerman Senterfitt in Ft. Lauderdale. He concentrates in business and commercial litigation, real estate litigation, pharmaceutical and medical device litigation, and international litigation. Cathy S. Reiman has become partner with Roetzel & Andress in Naples. Reiman focuses in commercial litigation, dispute resolution, and probate litigation. Armando Olmedo and Barbara Viniegra have become associated with Gunster Yoakley. Olmedo, formerly of Sills Cummis Radin Tischman Epstein & Gross, P.A., in San Francisco, has joined the corporate department and immigration practice group in Miami. Viniegra, previously with Kenyon & Kenyon in New York City, and a forensic chemist with the Drug Enforcement Administration, Southeast Laboratory in Miami, has joined the litigation department in Ft. Lauderdale. Nicholas E. Bouyoucas has become associated with the Karp Law Firm. He concentrates in estate planning and real estate transactions in the firm’s Boynton office as well as other locations. The Karp Law Firm focuses in estate planning and elder law. Thomas R. Brice, formerly of Allen, Norton & Blue, P.A., in Tampa, has become a partner with McGuireWoods in Jacksonville. He focuses his practice on defending employers against claims of workplace discrimination. The Law Offices of Barry M. Wax has relocated to 701 Brickell Ave., Ste. 2080, Miami, 33131, phone: (305) 373-4400, e-mail: barrywax@bellsouth.net. Wax concentrates in federal and state criminal defense, post conviction relief, and asset forfeiture. Shutts & Bowen has elected four partners to various firm locations. Jennifer L. Slone concentrates in real estate, and is in the Orlando office. Anthony T. Golden concentrates in complex taxation, estate planning, estate administration, and real estate matters for domestic and international clients. Mark D. Hobson concentrates in corporate, securities, secured lending (including Export-Import Bank of the U.S. insured and guaranteed transactions), and international transactional matters. Golden and Hobson are in the Miami office. Neil B.Shoter focuses in commercial leasing, purchase and sale transactions, developer and building owner representation, and construction contracts. He is in the West Palm Beach office. McIntosh, Sawran, Peltz Cartaya & Petruccelli, P.A, has opened a new office in Tampa, with offices at 2202 N.W. Shore Blvd., Ste. 200, Tampa, 33607, phone: (813) 639-7630, fax: (813) 639-7631. Roland Sanchez-Medina, Jr., announces the opening of Sanchez-Medina & Associates, P.A., with offices atThe Colonnade, Ste. 302, 2333 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables, 33134, phone: 305-448-4344. Sanchez-Medina concentrates in corporate, real estate, and tax law. Harlan Sands has been appointed executive director of the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology at Florida International University. Edward P. Ahrens, Jr., announces the relocation of his office to 5506 Branch Oak Place, Lithia, 33547, phone: (813) 661-2662. George F. deClaire has become of counsel to Butzel Long in Boca Raton. He concentrates in estate planning matters.Boehm, Brown, Fischer & Harwood, P.A., has changed its name to Boehm , Brown, Fischer, Harwood, Kelly & Scheihing, P.A., with offices at 113 Executive Circle Daytona Beach, 32114, Daytona Beach, 32120, phone: (386) 258-3341, fax: (386) 255-1510; 101 Southhall Ln., Orlando, 32802, phone: (407) 660-0990, fax: 407-660-5052; 230 N.E. 25th Ave., Ocala, 34470, Ocala, FL 34478, phone: (352) 622-8160, fax: (352) 732-8808. March 1, 2004 Regular Newscenter_img March 1, 2004 On the Movelast_img read more

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Wednesday people roundup

first_imgUK Pensions Policy Institute – Pensions veteran Lawrence Churchill has been appointed chair-elect of the UK research institution, set to succeed Michael Pomery as chairman of Council at the PPI AGM in June, subject to approval of the PPI governors. Welcoming Churchill’s appointment, Sally Greengross, PPI president, said he brought “a wealth of knowledge and relevant experience to the role”. This includes his past chairmanship of NEST, the default vehicle for the UK’s new auto-enrolment pension system, which he helped launch. He also set up the Pension Protection Fund, the UK lifeboat fund, and has been chief executive of three insurance groups. He is currently a trustee at the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK) and Age UK, and holds various other non-executive positions.Legal & General Investment Management – Nicholas Bamber has joined the asset manager as head of private assets, a newly created role in which he will be responsible for building LGIM’s private debt capabilities. The appointment is subject to regulatory approval. Bamber joins from Royal Bank of Scotland, where he worked for more than 20 years, most recently as head of corporate coverage in the UK. AllianceBernstein – Stephen Wells has been appointed director on the consultant relations team for the defined benefit and defined contribution investment markets. Based in London, Wells joins from Newton Investment Management, where he was senior institutional business development manager. Association of Investment Companies – Sarah Evans and Patrick Reeve have joined the AIC board, while Chris Russell and David Thorp have stepped down. William Hemmings and Melville Trimble were re-elected. The board changes were decided at the association’s AGM. Evans is non-executive director and audit committee chair of HICL Infrastructure Company, JPMorgan Senior Secured Loan Fund, NB Distressed Debt Investment Fund and Crystal Amber Fund. Among other positions, Reeve is managing partner at Albion Ventures and a member of the board of the British Venture Capital Association (BCVA), where he is also chair of the BVCA Venture Public Policy Committee. Willis Towers Watson – Bob Tyley and Mary Boyle have joined the consultant’s growing insurance investment solutions group a month after two similar recent senior appointments. Boyle and Tyler have more than 50 years of industry experience between them. Boyle joins from Just Retirement, where she was interim head of investment strategy. Their appointments further reflect increasing demand for investment services from insurers, according to Willis Towers Watson.AMP Capital – Andrea McElhinney has been promoted to investment director, social and aged care infrastructure, with responsibility for the day-to-day portfolio management of the firm’s Australia and New Zealand-focused community infrastructure fund Pictet Asset Management, Eaton Vance Management International, Aviva Investors, Irish Pensions Authority, TASC, Barnardo’s Ireland, UK Pensions Policy Institute, Legal & General Investment Management, Royal Bank of Scotland, AllianceBernstein, Newton Investment Management, Association of Investment Companies, Willis Towers Watson, AMP CapitalPictet Asset Management – Niall Quinn has been appointed global head of institutional business (excluding Japan), starting at the end of February. Quinn joins from Eaton Vance Management International, where he was managing director, with responsibility for all operations outside North America and a focus on institutional business development. Based in London, Quinn will succeed Christoph Lanter, who is retiring after 17 years at Pictet.Aviva Investors – The asset manager has created a new leadership team for its liquid markets division following the decision by David Lis, CIO for multi-assets and equities, to retire in March from his full-time role. Lis has been with Aviva for 18 years. He will continue to work with the asset manager as a consultant after stepping down from his full-time responsibilities. Mark Connolly has been promoted to CIO for liquid markets, encompassing multi-assets, fixed income and equities. He was previously CIO for fixed income. Dan James and Chris Murphy have been promoted to the roles of global head of fixed income and global head of equities, respectively. Peter Fitzgerald continues as global head of multi-assets. James, Murphy and Fitzgerald will form a new investment leadership team that will report to Connolly.Irish Pensions Authority – David Begg has been appointed to a five-year term as chairman of the Irish pensions regulator, succeeding Jane Williams. Begg is currently director of think tank TASC and chairman of children’s charity Barnardo’s Ireland. He was previously secretary general of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions and has held non-executive board position at Aer Lingus and the Central Bank of Ireland.last_img read more

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Manson to Dredge U.S. Naval Station Kings Bay

first_imgManson Construction Co. has just won a contract for the U.S. Naval Station Kings Bay maintenance dredging works.The $9.8 million contract was awarded by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District, on Friday, September 14, 2018.The work consist of maintenance dredging of the Kings Bay Entrance Channel Cut-1N through Range-E.According to the Corps, the excavated material will be distributed among the Fernandina Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMDS) and the Fernandina Nearshore Disposal Area.USACE also added that the incidental work includes turbidity monitoring, endangered species monitoring, vibration monitoring, beach fill quality control, and sea turtle non-capture trawling.The anticipated Period of Performance is 180 calendar days from issuance of Notice to Proceed.last_img read more

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Chelsea open Stamford Bridge for players to train under condition

first_img But the Dutchman whose Blues career has been ravaged by injury utilised “top notch” Stamford Bridge to stay in shape. The Dutch midfielder has made just four first team appearances since his 2013 transfer He was most recently on loan with PSV Eindhoven in his homeland and explained his situation to PSV TV. He said: “The boys who live nearby can train in the stadium. So this is ideal for me. You only have to train on your own, so it is a bit boring. “But I also trained in a park and the field is a lot less there. It’s top-notch in Stamford Bridge.” The Blues have been widely commended for their reaction to coronavirus and were particularly praised for offering NHS staff free accommodation at the Millenium Hotel at Stamford Bridge during the fight against the pandemic. Loading… Chelsea have opened Stamford Bridge to allow local players to train amid the coronavirus outbreak. Blues outcast Marco van Ginkel was seen training alone at the stadium as the club have insisted on solo sessions only. Chelsea have opened Stamford Bridge for local players to train The Dutchman – who has made just four first team appearances since signing for the West Londoners in 2013 – posted footage of his individual workout on his Instagram. He posted the clip alongside a caption that read: “Staying in as much as possible, but happy to live close to the stadium and do my training #staysafe #keepongoing #cfc.” Blues outcast Marco van Ginkel posted footage from the stadium but stars must exercise alone amid coronavirus fears The majority of Blues players are working out at home in order to stay fit during lockdown.Advertisement Read Also: Football star claims his cow was ‘raped’ by drug-crazed gangChairman Bruce Buck contacted the NHS to strike up the deal, with owner Abramovich generously covering all costs.That is in spite of reports the Russian has seen his net worth plummet by £2.4BILLION over coronavirus.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show You5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone7 Of The Wealthiest Universities In The World13 kids at weddings who just don’t give a hootFans Don’t Know What She Looks Like NowThe Highest Paid Football Players In The World6 Best ’90s Action Movies To Watch Today7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty Penny7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The Worldlast_img read more

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