Oteil Burbridge To Take “Oteil & Friends” On The Road This Fall

March 2nd, 2021

first_imgWhile off tour with Dead & Company, bassist Oteil Burbridge will keep busy with his own band this Fall. As revealed in a recent Reddit AMA, Burbridge will tour with his solo project, Oteil & Friends, in November with JGB keyboardist Melvin Seals, Lettuce/Soulive guitarist Eric Krasno, Further guitarist John Kadlecik, Primus/RatDog/Electric Beethoven drummer Jay Lane, former Nth Power and current Trombone Shorty percussionist Weedie Braimah, and vocalist Alfreda Gerald. Burbridge surrounds himself with the best, always, and this new band formation is no exception.“Let Oteil Sing” Campaign Brings $4K To The Gorilla Doctors Following Dead & Co’s 2017 Summer TourAlso in the AMA, Oteil revealed that his “new record will be coming out this fall” in support of the upcoming Oteil & Friends tour in November. Today, two shows were prematurely announced at the Soundstage in Baltimore on November 8, and Le Poisson Rouge in New York on November 9. Pre-sale for tickets open for both shows on Wednesday, August 23 and will open general on-sale on August 25. More information will become available on Oteil’s website later this week with a full announcement.[H/T JamBase]last_img read more

Bud Light River City Rockfest Announces Nine Inch Nails, Primus, Stone Temple Pilots, More

March 2nd, 2021

first_imgThe sixth annual Bud Light River City Rockfest will return to September 22 at the AT&T Center Grounds in San Antonio, Texas. The 2018 event will be headlined by Nine Inch Nails, marking the band’s fourth U.S. show of 2018, following three nights in Las Vegas, NV on June 13, 15, and 16 at The Joint at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. The complete lineup for Bud Light River City Rockfest features Primus, Stone Temple Pilots, Bush, Chevelle, Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, Clutch, Hellyeah, Clutch, Yelawolf, Suicidal Tendencies, The Sword, and more.Tickets go on sale today, April 30, at 12 p.m. CT. For more information, head to the event website.last_img

Listen To A Classic 3-Set Phish Show At Nectar’s From 30 Years Ago Today [Audio]

March 2nd, 2021

first_imgAs Phish worked their way from a Vermont novelty to national sensation, one venue played a pivotal role in this transformation. Nestled in Burlington, VT, a small club called Nectar’s gave the jam group a stage for their wild antics on a regular basis. The band’s gathering grew with each passing performance, garnering a word-of-mouth following that you just had to see to believe. After 35 years of playing together, the word “Phish” has been uttered by quite a lot of mouths.The show played on this date in 1988 was typical for Phish at the time, mixing some of their original music with choice covers like Allman Brothers Band’s “Whipping Post” and ZZ Top’s “La Grange.” Tons of the band’s classic original songs were already in the mix, including “The Curtain With”, “Alumni Blues”, “Golgi Apparatus”, “Fluffhead”, “The Sloth”, “Fee”, and more.The third set (yes—three whole sets!) opened with the calypso vibes of “Ya Mar”, which led the band to welcome reggae vocalist Jah Roy to the stage for a light-hearted patois improv “Jam” that heavily incorporated the band’s name. They even managed to work in a “Harpua” before closing out the show with “Run Like An Antelope”.Thankfully, a master recording of the night is available for us all to enjoy. Tune in below, transferred by Jimmy Sellers, remastered by Ben Mohr, and uploaded to YouTube by fromtheaquarium:Phish – 5/24/88 – Nectar’sSetlist: Phish | Nectar’s | Burlington, VT | 5/24/88Set 1: The Curtain With, Rocky Top, Funky Bitch, Alumni Blues > Letter to Jimmy Page > Alumni Blues, Peaches en Regalia, Golgi Apparatus, Sneakin’ Sally Through the Alley, Suzy Greenberg, FireSet 2: Jesus Just Left Chicago, Fluffhead > Whipping PostSet 3: Ya Mar[1] -> Jam[1] > Halley’s Comet[2] > The Sloth, I Didn’t Know[3], La Grange, Fee, I Know a Little, Big Black Furry Creature from Mars, Corinna, Harpua, Run Like an Antelope[1] Jah Roy on vocals.[2] Richard Wright on vocals.[3] Richard Wright on drums, Fish on trombone.Notes: Ya Mar and the ensuing jam featured vocals from Jah Roy; the jam contained One Love quotes from Jah Roy and Trey. Halley’s Comet featured vocals from Richard Wright. I Didn’t Know featured Wright on drums and Fish on trombone. BBFCFM contained Flintstones theme teases from Trey. The master recordings confirm this listing as the correct performance order. Many recordings of this show circulate with an incorrect song order, an incorrect date (May 25, 1988) and an incorrect venue (Ian’s Farm, Hebron, NY)last_img read more

Pudding Pot princess

March 1st, 2021

first_imgShe’s played a princess, a dowdy journalist turned Vogue fashionista, and a secret agent. She’s been nominated for an Academy Award, a Golden Globe, and a Screen Actors Guild Award, but today (Jan. 28) Brooklyn-born actress Anne Hathaway won acclaim of another caliber: the Hasty Pudding‘s highest honor, and with it a Pudding Pot.But all good things must wait, and before Woman of the Year Hathaway, 27, could gain her prize, she took a stroll through a brisk Harvard Yard on a tour led by Lucy Baird ’10. Looking ravishing in a patriotic crimson coat, Hathaway remained spirited even as snow began to fall, and she was without a hat.Arriving at the John Harvard Statue, “The Devil Wears Prada” actress playfully greeted it with: “Hi, dude.”Awed by Widener Library’s grandiosity, Hathaway sought a more in-depth look, charging the towering stairs and taking a peek around inside.Later that afternoon, the actress, fresh from a snowy parade of Harvard Square with the Hasty crew, donned sequins and serious heels for her roast inside the New College Theatre, where she endured the incessant teasing of hosts Clifford Murray ’10 and Derek Mueller ’10.Poking fun at her turns in the film “The Princess Diaries” and its sequel, “The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement,” Murray and Mueller called her “the second most famous Anne to keep a diary.” Hathaway never once lost composure, however, coolly shooting back, “Love that Anne Frank line.”Not even “Princess Diaries” co-star Julie Andrews could faze her. “What are a few of your favorite things?” sang an ersatz Andrews, played by Walter Klyce ’10.“A few of my favorite things, besides Harvard … ” Hathaway replied, before launching into song with, “Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens …”“Yes, that would be the correct answer for me,” Klyce shot back. “But I think you meant to say, ‘Appearing topless in movies.’”The actress will soon appear as the White Queen in Tim Burton’s rendition of “Alice in Wonderland.” She famously starred in “Brokeback Mountain,” “Bride Wars,” “Get Smart,” and “Rachel Getting Married,” which earned her the Oscar nomination. She’s slated to star in “Get Happy,” a biography on Judy Garland, whom Hathaway resembles not only in looks — she can sing, too.Ordered to croon by an apparition of the one, the only, Liza Minnelli, 1973’s Woman of the Year, Hathaway beautifully trilled about her skills to the tune of “Over the Rainbow,” a feat which finally persuaded Murray and Mueller to declare her worthy of the golden Pudding Pot.“I get a little overeager and excited about things,” explained Hathaway, who didn’t trust herself enough to wing an acceptance speech.So she read a poem she’d penned herself.“I feel warm and gooey inside,” read Hathaway, “joyous with my reddened backside, that your roast smacked upside. My rump is swollen with pride.”Hathaway’s Man of the Year counterpart Justin Timberlake will be at Harvard on Feb. 5. For more on the Man and Woman of the Year, or Hasty Pudding’s production “Commie Dearest.” Lady in red Decked in a bright cherry coat, Hathaway takes a breather from the arctic blast inside Widener. The parade brigade Clifford Murray ’10 and Derek Mueller ’10 flank Hathaway on a drive down Mass. Ave. A good sport Hathaway took Hasty’s jabs and delivered some barbs of her own. Glitterati A bedazzled Hathaway takes it to the stage to collect her Pudding Pot. Beauty and the man dressed like a beast Hathaway had to slay the dragon — just one of the tasks that brought her closer to the coveted Pudding Pot. Woman of the Year Actress Anne Hathaway is undeterred by the snow on her tour of Harvard Yard by Lucy Baird ’10. Books a million Wonderment ensues inside Widener as Hathaway seeks a better look at the behemoth library. A spoon full of nudity Walter Klyce ’10, dressed as Julie Andrews, encourages Hathaway to be naked in more films. Justin ide, Stephanie Mitchell, Kristyn Ulanday/Harvard Staff Photographers Woman of the Year Gallery Strike a pose Mueller and Murray showing off their Woman of the Year. Backstage cowboys Matther Bohrer ’10 and Ryan Halprin ’12 wait for their cue. The lady & the tramps Vogue-ing it up in a topless Bentley for a joyride around town. How sweet it is A Pudding Pot and a smile.last_img read more

Pass the popcorn

March 1st, 2021

first_imgEveryone knows the story of Rosa Parks. In 1955, she refused to give up her bus seat in Montgomery, Ala., to a white passenger, an act of defiance that became a symbol for the modern civil rights movement.But few people know the parallel story of Ida B. Wells. In 1884, on a railroad car near Memphis, Tenn., she was ordered to give up her seat to a white passenger. Wells refused, and it took three men to remove her.What happened in that railroad car became part of “Ida B. Wells: A Passion For Justice,” a 53-minute documentary released in 1989. Fragments of it were shown recently at the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America.The showing was part of a little-known but long-running Radcliffe film series, “Movie Night at the Schlesinger Library,” a quiet tradition that rarely fills the 30 chairs in the Radcliffe College Room. In its present iteration, the monthly program started in 2000 and — with a two-year break for library renovations —has run ever since.Showing one long film was once the norm, said Schlesinger audiovisual cataloger Melissa Dollman, but this year’s series has screened short films related to the library’s collections. Showing with “Ida B. Wells” was “Jeannette Rankin: The Woman Who Voted No,” a 30-minute PBS documentary on the sole member of Congress who voted against entering both World War I and World War II.Rankin was a lifelong pacifist and peace activist. Her last antiwar effort targeted the Vietnam War. The film showed an antiwar rally. “They can stop the war,” Rankin said simply, by “not supporting it.” Then came a shot of her being helped into a police wagon.The movie series offers advantages. It’s an intimate venue, with the chairs arrayed in rows of five. It offers unusual fare. One of the next films, playing March 3, is “We Dig Coal: A Portrait of Three Women.” And each set of films comes with expert commentary.Holding forth on Wells (1862-1931) and Rankin (1880-1973) were Schlesinger manuscript catalogers Marilyn Morgan and Emilyn Brown, both members of the film committee that makes selections for movie night.Brown outlined Wells’ remarkable life: born the year before emancipation, a teacher by age 14, and a Memphis journalist in her 20s who campaigned against lynching and racial violence. Harried out of the South, Wells settled in Chicago, where she married and continued a restless campaign for racial and gender justice.Wells, a founder of the NAACP, was a friend of leading feminist and rights leader Susan B. Anthony. (Anthony was disappointed when Wells decided to marry and raise a family.)Rankin was the first woman elected to Congress. On her first day in office (April 2, 1917), the Montana Republican voted against America’s entry into World War I. Though joined in her opposition by 49 males, the move temporarily cut Rankin’s political career short and branded her — in the words of a contemporary — “weak and sentimental.”Rankin’s pacifism grew between the wars. By 1940 she had been elected again, this time on an antiwar platform. When Rankin voted against America’s entry into war in December 1941, this time she cast the lone dissenting vote. It was an act that for years after brought her hatred.Both Rankin and Wells, despite their accomplishments, rich lives, and one-time fame, are little known now. “A lot of people get written out,” said Morgan, who has a doctorate in history.“We have figures who have become obscure,” said Brown of Wells and Rankin. And yet, she added, “They have laid the foundations we stand on.”The next movie night will take place March 3 at 6 p.m. at 10 Garden St., Radcliffe Yard. The featured films are “We Dig Coal” (1981) and “We’re Here to Stay: Women in the Trades” (1986). For more information, call 617.495.8647. For a list of films playing this season.last_img read more

Election reflection by Dukakis

March 1st, 2021

first_imgAs the last days before the presidential election tick down, a man who has seen the sausage-making process from the inside said that there’s much at stake, and “every day is important here.”In a wide-ranging talk at Harvard on Thursday, Michael Dukakis, the 1988 Democratic candidate for president, discussed attempts to suppress “likely Democratic” voters by making it difficult for them to register, the Electoral College (“It should have been abolished 150 years ago; it’s a profoundly undemocratic body”), and even rail transport, which brought out the fan in the longtime T rider.But he kept circling back to health care and the economy, subjects likely to weigh heavily with voters on Tuesday. Dukakis said that Democratic President Barack Obama “has done something no other president managed to do, and that is give us something close to universal health care.  Nixon tried it, Clinton tried it, Obama did it.”However, Dukakis added, “I don’t think my party has done a good job of communicating what the Affordable Care Act is all about.  We have 50 million Americans who have no health insurance. We have another 50 million who have very poor coverage. Ninety percent of these people are working or members of working families. Why hasn’t the [Democrats’] principal message been that working Americans will have affordable health care?”On the economy, Dukakis, a distinguished professor of political science at Northeastern University, pointed to the lessons taught by President Herbert Hoover’s policies and the Great Depression.“We’re in a big economic hole, and we’re going to get out of it, but austerity can’t get you out of a recession,” he said. “I don’t know why we have to learn this lesson over and over again. It just doesn’t work.”During the discussion hosted by the Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Dukakis also addressed his party’s defensive stand on national security, pointing out that many Democratic politicians are too worried about being considered soft to bring a critical eye to defense spending, which a recent Cato Institute policy analysis concluded could sustain cuts with only slightly adverse effects.“We have a defense budget that’s so bloated it’s unbelievable,” Dukakis said. “But I don’t see any Democrats in Congress falling over themselves to endorse what the Cato Institute is proposing.”Dukakis, a former three-term governor of Massachusetts, said of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, another ex-governor of the state, “If Romney wins, I think you’ll get the Republican game plan: more tax cuts for the wealthy, more cuts to the budget without reducing the deficit one dime.”Should Obama be re-elected, Dukakis suggested, “You’re going to have a battle, but I think the president is firm on the question of additional tax cuts for the wealthy. He’d come back with more clout to a Republican Party that you’d think would be at least somewhat chastened.”Dukakis had harsh words for his onetime Harvard Law School classmate Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, and for the court’s recent decision in the case Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, which found that restricting political contributions by corporations and unions violated First Amendment rights to free speech.“I don’t know what happened to him. Scalia calls himself an originalist,” a justice who believes the Constitution should be interpreted as its authors intended, “but where in the Constitution does it say that money is speech?”Though the decision has not emerged as a major campaign issue, even though it has opened the door to increased spending, Dukakis said, “Who we elect as president, who in turn appoints justices to the Supreme Court, is important.”On foreign policy, Dukakis said he thought that Obama has an “intelligent, thoughtful worldview” and that Romney “is out of his element.”“The notion that the United States can continue to be the world’s policeman is badly flawed. We’re not doing it very well, and we can’t afford it,” said Dukakis, a self-proclaimed “committed internationalist.” Instead, he said America should play a new role, building up international peacekeeping institutions such as the International Court of Justice and encouraging their use.“I do think this is a huge opportunity,” Dukakis said, “not just for the world at large, but for the United States.”last_img read more

Heroes, day by day

March 1st, 2021

first_imgFamed actors, scholars, politicians, and musicians are among the many luminaries who have joined Harvard President Drew Faust on the Sanders Theatre stage. “But I have never been in better company,” Faust told an enthusiastic crowd on Thursday as she introduced Harvard’s 2013 Harvard Heroes, including a speedy cafeteria checker, a revolutionary library cataloger, a development rockstar, and a digital pioneer.The festive ceremony celebrates the accomplishments of men and women from across the University, unsung contributors who are nominated by their peers for their exceptional efforts and service to Harvard. The honorees form an eclectic and selective group; they represent only one-half of 1 percent of the Harvard staff, and are recognized for a range of criteria, including the ability to adapt to change, foster a culture of diversity and inclusion, lead, innovate, and demonstrate caring for others.“Thank you, Harvard Heroes, for your dedication to supporting and advancing the University’s mission of teaching and research. Each of you is committed to personal excellence and collective success, giving your best effort week after week, year after year, and — for some of you — decade after decade,” said Faust.Members of the Harvard community, friends, and families filled the hall to hoot and holler, clap and cheer for the 60 honorees whose talents and accomplishments are as diverse as the Harvard Schools and departments they represent.Timothy Collins, a maintenance technician at Harvard Medical School, keeps the campus’s low- and high-pressure boilers running smoothly, and also helps his colleagues “let off steam” by leading them in jiujitsu classes. In her role as communications manager at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, Meghan Sandberg helps to produce and distribute Harvard Design Magazine and is always “eager to help others,” said Faust. Custodial crew chief Michel Montimer “finishes tasks in a flash,” noted Faust, as part of his work for Harvard Campus Services.It’s the second season that the 18-year-old program has been University-wide but the first time it has honored those who help keep Harvard green. Ten women and men from across Harvard also were recognized for their efforts to improve Harvard’s environmental sustainability.“The incorporation of Green Heroes into the Harvard Heroes program is an exciting step forward in further embedding sustainability throughout the University,” said Heather Henriksen, director of the Harvard Office for Sustainability. “This new partnership with HR leaders is also a natural fit because our Green Heroes demonstrate many of the core attributes of a Harvard Hero in the way they act as environmental leaders in their workplace by strengthening community, promoting One Harvard collaboration, and inspiring others to innovate and act for change to benefit the University’s mission.”As a Green Hero, Jen Doleva, endowment, gift, and chart of accounts administrator, saved paper and money at the Harvard School of Public Health, encouraging her colleagues to compost, recycle, and take the stairs. “It isn’t easy being green,” Faust said, “but you make it easier.” Another Green Hero, Michael Goodwin, assistant director of operations at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, helped to introduce local foods at the Gutman Library café and partnered with the School’s Green Team to launch a composting program.Gail Collmann Griffin flexes her green thumb as the director of gardens and grounds at Harvard’s Dumbarton Oaks, helping it to flourish and making one of the University’s most “breathtaking resources” more accessible and sustainable, said Faust.One hero was deemed an MVP for keeping members of the Harvard community moving, literally. “You are … a clutch contributor season after season,” said Faust of Patricia Henry, senior associate director of athletics, who works closely with Harvard’s varsity teams and intramural and recreational programs.Some heroes braved the elements to get their jobs done. Gale-force winds didn’t stop Paraison Francois, building services assistant at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, when it came to keeping some of the University’s buildings in shape. Faust called his arrival at work during last year’s Hurricane Sandy and blizzard Nemo “a testament to your diligence and dedication.” In the words of his nominator, read Faust, “It is people like [you] who really make Radcliffe and Harvard a great place to work.”Harvard Executive Vice President Katie Lapp opened the event and introduced a brief video tribute honoring another group of Harvard Heroes, members of the University community who made “innumerable contributions” during the Boston Marathon bombings and the days that followed. We were moved, said Lapp, “by the many acts of bravery and generosity in the face of fear.”What makes the event so special, say its organizers, is the opportunity if affords Harvard staff members to honor their peers. The fact that the number of nominees doubled from last year, said Mary Ann O’Brien, director of planning and program management for Harvard Human Resources, is a sign of the recognition program’s broad appeal.“It’s a chance for Harvard employees to call out the accomplishments of their co-workers, especially when that contribution may not be easily visible to managers,” said O’Brien. As Harvard becomes less decentralized and more interdependent, she added, “People really need to rely on each other to get work done, and they really appreciate it when co-workers go above and beyond to collaborate, support them, provide great service, and make everyday work easier.”Attendees enjoyed live music and summery treats such as watermelon, gazpacho, and macaroni and cheese at a post-ceremony reception in Annenberg Hall. Amid a rush of warm wishes and hugs from family and friends, Bridget Duffy, honored for her work as an administrative coordinator in Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences, reflected on the importance of the event.“You are seeing a lot of people who are behind the scenes, doing things like being more green, or supporting people, not just doing the work, but doing the work well and caring about the community and the University as a whole.”The comments of Marilyn Hausammann, Harvard’s vice president for human resources, during the ceremony echoed those sentiments. “It is my hope that all of you, family members, friends, colleagues, managers, University leaders,” Hausammann said, “will be as inspired as we are to work beside these folks in Harvard’s world-changing mission.”“I am just grateful,” Duffy said of her award. “I love Harvard, and I am just really grateful to be here every day.”last_img read more

Professor Robert R. Bowie dies at 104

March 1st, 2021

first_imgRobert R. Bowie, the Clarence Dillon Professor of International Affairs Emeritus and founder and first director of the Center for International Affairs (now the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs) died Nov. 2 at the age of 104.Bowie’s career combined distinguished academic achievement with service at the highest levels of government.From 1946 to 1955, Bowie taught corporate and anti-trust law at Harvard Law School, with leaves of absence to serve as general counsel and special adviser to the U.S. high commissioner for Germany, John McCloy (1950-51), and as director of policy planning and assistant secretary of state under John Foster Dulles (1953-57). In this latter role he was a key figure in forging U.S. foreign policy during the Cold War.Returning to Harvard in 1957, Bowie became the first holder of the Clarence Dillon Professorship, named for the father of C. Douglas Dillon, treasury secretary under presidents Kennedy and Johnson.As founder and first director of the Center for International Affairs, Bowie presided over a distinguished group of scholars that included Edward Mason, Thomas Schelling, and Henry Kissinger. As director of the center, Bowie initiated a program to bring mid-career government officials from around the world to study at Harvard for a year, focusing on issues related to international affairs and foreign policy.Bowie directed the Center for International Affairs until 1972. In 1977, he returned to Washington to serve as deputy director for national intelligence at the Central Intelligence Agency, a position he held until 1979. He retired from Harvard in 1980.Born in Baltimore, Md., in 1909, Bowie earned an A.B. degree from Princeton in 1931 and an LL.B. from Harvard Law School in 1934. Bowie practiced law in Baltimore until 1942, when he joined the U.S. Army with the rank of captain. After the war, he became special assistant to General Lucius Clay, the deputy military governor for Germany, a post he held until 1946. On his 100th birthday the Federal Republic of Germany presented him with the Commander’s Cross of the Order of Merit for his work on Germany’s post-war integration in the West, Franco-German reconciliation, European integration, and German unification.His books include “Studies in Federalism” (1954); “Arms Control and United States Foreign Policy” (1961); “Shaping the Future: Foreign Policy in an Age of Transition” (1964); “Suez 1956” (1974); and “Waging Peace: How Eisenhower Shaped an Enduring Cold War Strategy” (1998). Through the mid-1980s, Bowie wrote a regular column on foreign policy for the Christian Science Monitor.Bowie was predeceased by his wife of 62 years, Mary Theodosia Chapman Bowie, and is survived by two sons, Robert Jr. of Monkton, Md., and William Chapman of Springfield, Mass., and three grandchildren, Alice, Robert, and Peter.In 1997, the Bowies moved to Blakehurst in Towson, Md., and were cared for in their final years by the staff at Chestnut Green. Funeral services will be held for family and friends Dec. 7 at 11 a.m. at the Old Wye Church in Wye Mills, Md.last_img read more

Possible progress against Parkinson’s

March 1st, 2021

first_imgHarvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers at University-affiliated McLean Hospital have taken what they describe as an important step toward using the implantation of stem cell-generated neurons as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease.Ole Isacson and colleagues reported that dopamine-producing neurons derived from the skin cells of primates survived for more than two years after implantation into one of the animals, and markedly reduced its Parkinson’s symptoms. The primate did not require immunosuppression, the scientists reported in the journal Cell Stem Cell.Penelope J. Hallett, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School (HMS) who works at McLean with Isacson, is the first author on the paper.Such positive results were only seen in one animal because the experimental protocols evolved and were improved over time. Originally, the experiments were conducted using neurons derived from embryonic stem cells, which required using immunosuppressive drugs in the animals, and did not produce results that were as positive.The current experiments used induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells, which use a patient’s own skin cells to create the stem cells and then the neurons, so the patient — or in this case, the primate — does not recognize the new dopamine-producing neurons as foreign and reject them.“It’s very difficult to get cell survival in primates,” said Isacson, who has been refining his experiments for more than 15 years. “This is a very high bar to clear.” Isacson is an HSCI principal faculty member, an HMS professor of neurology, and director of the Center for Neuroregeneration Research/ Neuroregeneration Laboratories at McLean.Isacson said the conclusion of this experiment marks “the first time that an animal has recovered to the same activity level he had before.” He noted that the animal was “able to move as fast around its home cage” as an animal without Parkinson’s, and had normal agility, though individual motions were still slowed by the disease.In this latest experiment, the neurons were implanted into only one side of the animals’ brains, and the improvements were seen on the opposite side, as would be expected.Parkinson’s, which may affect as many as 1 million Americans, is caused by a depletion of dopamine-producing neurons in the brain. The disease causes a range of symptoms, from mild tremors to dementia and death, and can include slowed movements, muscle rigidity, tremors, changes in speech, loss of autonomic movement, and related issues. Current treatments include medications, electrical implants in the brain, and, in a limited number of cases, fetal neuron transplants.Isacson stressed that there are a number of technical hurdles to be cleared before his team will be ready for its first clinical trial. He said he and Kevin Eggan, another HSCI principal faculty member working on neurological diseases, as well as other Harvard clinicians “will have to establish a protocol we believe will be safe and desirable from a clinical standpoint.”“Conservatively, I’d say we’re three years” from requesting the go-ahead from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for a Phase 1 clinical trial, Isacson said.“Our next year will be dedicated to making cells” free of contaminants, creating a matrix on which to grow cells that “is free of any animal proteins,” and establishing a cell-freezing protocol, which will be necessary for transporting and storing the cells. Additionally, he said, the researchers need to perfect cell-sorting technology.The current experiments were funded by HSCI and the Harvard Miller Consortium.last_img read more

Shareholder report available Jan. 15

March 1st, 2021

first_imgThe 2015 Annual Report of the Corporation Committee on Shareholder Responsibility (CCSR), a subcommittee of the President and Fellows, is now available on the Shareholder Responsibility Committees’ website.The report provides a detailed description of the CCSR’s actions on shareholder proposals regarding issues of social responsibility that came to vote during the 2015 spring proxy voting season (the period between March and June when most publicly traded corporations hold annual meetings). This year, the committees considered 54 proposals dealing with issues of social responsibility that were addressed to corporations whose securities were owned directly by Harvard. Issues raised through the proxy process this year included corporate political contributions and lobbying; corporate charitable contributions; executive compensation; equal employment; Internet policies regarding privacy and neutrality; and corporate environmental practices on a wide range of issues, from company efforts to address global warming to risks from hydraulic fracturing and from board-level environmental expertise to deforestation and the palm oil supply chain.New topics addressed in 2015 included pesticide risks, stranded fossil fuel assets, and fair employment rights in Israel and Palestine.The CCSR receives advice from the Advisory Committee on Shareholder Responsibility, a 12-member committee made up of Harvard faculty, students, and alumni.last_img read more