On appeal

May 12th, 2021

first_img Previous Article Next Article Continuing our regular series spelling out the implications of importantcases which have been heard recently in the appeal courts. Sue Nickson looks atthe issuesToo old to claim Harvest Town Circle v Rutherford 2001 EAT 18 July 2001 Rutherford was 67 years old when he was told he was being made redundantfrom his position as a production controller with Harvest Town Circle. Thecompany did not operate a normal retiring age higher than 65. He presented aclaim of unfair dismissal and redundancy on the grounds that there was no trueredundancy situation. In order to succeed in his claim, it would be necessary for him to establishthat the provisions of the Employment Rights Act 1996 (ERA) that preventedemployees over normal retirement age claiming unfair dismissal or redundancywere in breach of Article 141 of the European Union. He claimed that as Article 141 required the principle of equal pay to beapplied between men and women and the fact that more men worked beyond the ageof 65, the upper age limit on claims was indirectly discriminatory. Statisticswere produced to show that in the five years up to the date of dismissal, therewas a considerably higher percentage of men over 65 being economically active.The tribunal, therefore, found that the provisions of the ERA were indirectlydiscriminatory on grounds of sex, unless it could be objectively justified byother factors. The Employment Appeal Tribunal remitted the case back for a rehearing. Itwas found that the statistics relied upon by the EAT were inadequate. Theycontained all those who had been at, or available for work in a two-week periodwhen over the age of 65. This could include directors, partners and others whowould not in any event be affected by unfair dismissal and redundancy law.Equally, the statistics did not take into consideration those who weredismissed at the age of 65 or resigned to avoid dismissal. Secondly, it held that it was unreasonable for the tribunal to expect asmall company like Harvest Town Circle to be able to adequately put forward theobjective justification points available to support important primarylegislation. The tribunal should in have invited the Secretary of State toconsider arguments to put forward by way of objective justification. The upper age limit on claims, therefore, stays intact, however whether itwill continue to do so is far from clear. Certainly, while allowing thisappeal, the EAT has not closed the door on further possible challenges. As the present government is committed to introducing age discriminationlegislation, it appears that this will be a subject before further appealcourts in the near future. All workers have rights to holiday R v Secretary of State for Trade and Industry ex parte Bectu ECJ 26.6.01Case C-173/99) Bectu (the Broadcasting, Entertainment, Cinematographic and Theatre Union)was aware that many of its members were on short-term contracts with various employers,and so did not qualify for paid annual leave under the Working TimeRegulations. The union issued judicial review proceedings, claiming the 13-weekqualifying period for annual leave under the regulations was unlawful, as itdid not adequately implement the provisions of the EU Working Time Directive.The High Court referred the matter to the European Court of Justice. The ECJ found that the purpose of the directive was to lay down minimumrequirements to improve the living and working conditions of workers. Theprovision for paid leave was not a requirement which member states were allowedto derogate from. It followed, therefore, that the entitlement of every workerto this must be regarded as a particularly important principle of community sociallaw. Therefore, while regulations may be imposed as to how holidays will betaken, it would be unlawful for regulations to specify any that may prevent aworker from having the right in the first place. Draft regulations were issued by the Government the day after the judgementwas made, and included a shorter one-month consultation period in order to giveeffect to this ruling as soon as possible. When in force, it will mean thatworkers will have the right to accrue holidays from their first day in work,regardless of the length of the contract. Actions speak louder than words Bradley v Greater Manchester Fire and Civil Defence Authority IRLB 668July 2001 Bradley had suffered neck problems for some time and this had resulted invarious adjustments being made to her duties. She went off work following theseadjustments, and a subsequent medical examination found that as no furthermodifications could be made, she should be recommended for ill-healthretirement. She claimed disability discrimination. The tribunal found she was disabled and that her dismissal amounted to lessfavourable treatment. But it also found that the employers had shown materialand substantial justification. On appeal, the decision was upheld that the employers had shownjustification. The argument that they could not later rely upon the statutorydefence of justification if they had not raised it before, was also rejected.The assessment was objective, and the EAT found the steps the employers hadtaken should be assessed as such. The EAT preferred the view expressed in British Gas Services Ltd v McCaul2001 that actions, not thoughts, are of importance. There had previously beenuncertainty, as the EAT in Quinn v Schwarzkopf 2001 held an employer could notrely upon provisions in the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 if he had notconsciously considered those provisions. Unambiguous “sex” Advocate General for Scotland v MacDonald 1.6.01 Court of Session MacDonald felt compelled to resign from the Armed Forces after beingquestioned about his private life and revealing that he was homosexual. Heclaimed sex discrimination. The tribunal took the decision to hold, contrary to previous authority, that”sex” in the Sex Discrimination Act (SDA) was ambiguous. Taking intoaccount the European Convention on Human Rights, it should be interpreted asreferring to discrimination on grounds of orientation as well as gender. The Court of Session has reversed this, taking us back to the establishedposition that the SDA covers only gender discrimination and that it is for thegovernment to extend discrimination legislation to orientation. Sue Nickson is a partner and national head of employment law at HammondSuddards Edge On appealOn 7 Aug 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Online learning makes inroads

May 12th, 2021

first_imgThe CIPD show, Europe’s largest management exhibition, has its fair share oftraining-related exhibitors and events this year. More than 100 of the 330 companies exhibiting in five halls at the Harrogateshow are involved in some form of training, ranging from e-learning andtraining-needs software to outdoor development, business schools and executivecoaching. As well as the exhibition and conference, there will be a free programme offringe sessions covering topics such as drama-based training, strategiclearning and coaching to achieve behavioural change. And in keeping with the times, the exhibition is witnessing a significantincrease in e-learning providers. “I’ve noticed a big increase in exhibitors covering areas likee-learning and online recruitment, and there is always a hard core ofmanagement consultancies, psychometrics companies and so on,” says JaneO’Hara, PR manager at Academee, which is launching a new e-learning programmebut also provides face-to-face training. O’Hara believes the economic uncertainties will put pressure on trainingbudgets, but that e-learning could benefit. “It often has cost benefits compared with face-to-face training and isan effective way of offering retraining to people made redundant,” shesays. Integrated Approach But it is important that organisations do not regard e-learning as a replacementfor other programmes, she argues. “It should be part of an integratedtraining approach, including face-to-face learning.” Other e-learning exhibitors include Go MAD, which is launching an onlinelearning and assessment product, and Citizen Connect, whose partners includethe University for Industry, for which it is providing an online learning andcareer management programme for adults. As well as online delivery of training, new technology has also led todevelopments in areas like training needs analysis, which is reflected in theexhibitors. For example, Cascaid will be launching a training needs analysis softwareprogramme aimed specifically at the retail sector. “TNA is becoming more accessible for companies with the move away from time-consumingpaper-based systems to TNA software,” says spokesman Leo Kendall. Assessing training needs is becoming more critical for organisations, agreesRoy Davis, head of communications at another exhibitor, SHL. “Particularly in the current downturn, when training budgets are likelyto come under a lot of pressure, it’s essential that organisations areconvinced of the value of their training programmes.” At the other learning extreme from PC-based training is outdoor development.Exhibitors include Derwent Hill, in the Lake District, and Brookfield Manor,which has recently installed a ropes challenge course at its centre. But here too providers expect a growing focus by clients on value for money.John Driscoll, marketing manager at the Lake District-based Dove Nest Group,says clients are increasingly finding it hard to visit for longer courses andso the trend has been to squeeze as much training into a shorter period. “There’s been a big move in recent years away from five- or evenseven-day courses to shorter ones,” he says, adding that this reflects theincreasing time pressures on managers. The company has tackled this demand by shortening some courses to threedays, but building in more training during the pre-course visit to the client andfollow-up sessions. “That allows us to cover some of the material that has been cut fromthe original course,” he says. As well as the more traditional training providers, there are a number ofexhibitors focusing on more esoteric approaches, such as EIUK, a specialistcentre for the measurement of individual and team emotional intelligencecoaching and development. It’s the company’s third visit to the exhibition and founder Geetu Ormesays, “There’s been a fair amount of scepticism in previous years aboutemotional intelligence as a form of development but now we’re seeing a lot morepeople interested.” She cites clients such as PricewaterhouseCoopers, Ford Europe and thecharity Scope as illustrating the growing interest in the subject. Exhibitors say there has been an evolution in the kind of delegatesattending the show in recent years, with a move away from HR director level totheir representatives, as well as an increase in non-HR managers. Roy Davis of SHL says the change is a reflection of the changing nature ofHR. “HR directors are now operating at a more strategic level so it’squestionable whether Harrogate still appeals to them as much. You’re morelikely to find staff on a ‘go fetch’ mission, where they know what they needbut want to look at the different products.” He has also noticed a growing number of non-HR specialists visiting theexhibition. “Line managers are finding it harder to hide behind HR when itcomes to learning and development and so we’re seeing more of them coming toHarrogate to see what’s on the market,” he says. Academee’s Jane O’Hara also welcomes the attendance of more non-HR managers,saying, “We’re meeting people from areas like sales and marketing, whichis good because it shows those people are now training people developmentseriously.” Alongside the exhibition will be a series of free fringe events, includingseveral in the training and development field. Ian Hardie, associate dean ofexecutive education at the London Business School, will be presenting oneseminar on “What do traditional business schools have to offer corporateuniversities?” Hardie says, “Corporate universities are becoming increasinglyimportant in executive development and one key theme is how business schoolsimplement training and development with corporate universities.” He will also be looking at the various models of corporate universities,from virtual universities to the bricks and mortar approach. The LBS has helped set up corporate universities such as US energy companyConnoco and financial services company Old Mutual. In another fringe seminar, firm of business psychologists the GrayPartnership will be examining how training can contribute to behaviouraldifferences in organisations. Managing director Annie Gray says too many organisations do not properlyevaluate whether training achieves the required behavioural differences. “Delegates on courses only retain 30 per cent of what they learn, onaverage, and too many organisations restrict their evaluation to superficial issues,such as whether delegates enjoyed the lunch, instead of examining severalmonths later whether behavioural differences have occurred.” She adds that a key point of the interactive seminar will explore howorganisations can improve the individual’s motivation to learn. The drama-based training company Steps will be highlighting diversityissues, such as disability, ageism and race, at another fringe event. Other training-related seminars include Maple Consulting’s look at howindividuals can stimulate thinking about their own career development andQTAB’s seminar on the benefits that strategic learning can bring toorganisational development. Training provider ASE will present a seminar on measuring approaches toproblem solving. The company will present data on how a “cognitive processprofile”, which uses innovations in psychometrics and computer technology,can help solve problems. Talk showSpeakers to listen out for include: – Don Tapscott, one of the world’s leading cyber gurus, is oneof the conference keynote speakers and he will be looking at lifelongorganisational learning in his talk on The New Economy on 26 October. Tapscott,author of Digital Capital, argues that in the new economy an organisation willonly be competitive if it can learn faster than its rivals.– On Thursday, speakers including Andrew Kakabadse of CranfieldSchool of Management and Tim Lewis, assistant chief constable of the RoyalUlster Constabulary, will discuss Leadership development and the top team. Onthe same day Prof Michael West of Aston Business School is among the speakerson Building leadership capability: a psychological perspective.– Also on Thursday, David Clutterbuck, chairman of the ITEMGroup, and Peter Matthews, partner in charge of business development at Ernst &Young, will speak on Coaching for leadership.– Friday’s events include a seminar on e-learning. Speakers areAlison Walker of British Airways, Gilly Salmon of the Open University BusinessSchool and John O’Connor of telecoms company Hutchison3G.– And on Friday, Prof Adrian Furnham of University College,London, and David Fairhurst, HR director at Tesco, discuss Managing culturechange, in a seminar chaired by Nottingham County Council chief executive PeterHousden.Getting there– Rail – go to York or Leeds to change for Harrogate– Road – the M1, M5, M6 and A1 motorways are close toHarrogate. – Air – Leeds/Bradford airport is 30 minutes’ drive Further details can be accessed from the CIPD website at www.cipd.co.ukTimes and datesThe conference and exhibition are held at the HarrogateInternational Centre and run from Wednesday 24 to Friday 26 October. Openingtimes are 10.30am to 6pm on Wednesday, 9.30am to 6pm on Thursday and 9.30am to3pm on Friday.The fringe programme, which is open to everyone on afirst-come, first-served basis, will run from 6.30 to 7.30pm on Wednesday, 8 to9am, 1 to 2pm and 6.30 to 7.30pm on Thursday and 8 to 9am on Friday.For details of the fringe programme and other details visit www.cipd.co.uk/nationalconference Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Online learning makes inroadsOn 1 Oct 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

HR must be on the top rung of the corporate ladder to boost profits

May 12th, 2021

first_imgHR must be on the top rung of the corporate ladder to boost profitsOn 23 Oct 2001 in HR transformation, Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:center_img Features list 2021 – submitting content to Personnel TodayOn this page you will find details of how to submit content to Personnel Today. We do not publish a… The figures below show that firms with HR board members are well ahead ofthe rest of the terms of share value. The profession asks, what more proof do CEOs need of its value?  By Mike BroadHR is a bit-part player at best if it does not have a seat in the boardroom,claimed one executive director of a FTSE 100 company. It only becomes part of the big picture when the HR director sits alongsidethe financial director as an equal, he added. HR directors believe the function needs to sit squarely in the foreground ofthis big picture – with a confident smile on its face – following the releasetoday of groundbreaking research by Andersen Human Capital UK, releasedexclusively to Personnel Today. It reveals that the average increase in earnings per share (EPS) of FTSE 100companies with HR directors on the board between 1996 and 2000 is nearly doublethat of those without them at that level. EPS increased by 88 per cent for those companies with boardroom HR, based on31 August 2001 figures. This compares favourably with the 44 per cent increase in EPS for all FTSE100 companies during that four-year period. Board-level HR directors interviewed by Personnel Today expressed reliefthat there was proof that when HR becomes involved in strategic decision making– which usually occurs at board level – there are quantifiable profitabilitygains. For some the need for board level HR is obvious. David Bell, director forpeople at publishers Pearson, and one of three executive directors on theboard, explained, “Companies like ours are brain driven and creative. Itis all about ideas and turning that into productivity, and to succeed we needpeople and money. “Our aim is to find, keep, and inspire the best people in our sector.It is as simple as that.” Cadbury Schweppes is a good example of a FTSE 100 company that has drivenforward productivity with the help of a board level HR director. It launched amanaging value programme in 1997 aimed at increasing EPS by at least 10 percent per year, generating more than £150m of free cashflow and doublingshareholder value every four years. HR played an integral role in its £1.3bn acquisition activity in 1999 and2000 aimed at growing its core business, and the restructuring of its seniormanagement. Strategic development has been separated from operational performance andthe new strategy team was given a wider remit, ranging from M&A planning todeveloping e-commerce and knowledge management. Bob Stack, chief HR officer and board member at Cadbury Schweppes,explained, “The HR role was extremely significant. Our chief executiveJohn Sunderland believes that creating shareowner value is 80 per cent aboutpeople and only 20 per cent analysis. “In many of the key elements of building capability, such asleadership, change management and management culture, HR played a leadrole.” The company surpassed its first two aims and achieved 84 per cent growth inshareowner return in four years. The managing value programme has been extendedto 2004. “Our company values mean that it would be inconceivable not to have HRon the board. Almost all strategic proposals that come in front of it have apeople capability aspect to them,” he added. The need for HRto sit on the board, and its ability to affect the bottomline, is clearly far greater in people-oriented businesses. Board-level HR has also played a central role in Scottish & Newcastle’sdrive to grow its core business and become a large multinational brewer. Thegroup employs more than 40,000 staff following the 1999 acquisition of thelargest French brewer Brasseries Kronenbourg, and Alken Maes, the secondlargest Belgian brewer, the following year. Henry Fairweather, group HR director of Scottish & Newcastle and boardmember, explained that boardroom HR has helped develop the appropriateorganisational cultures for these acquisitions and nurture a senior managementteam capable of running a multicultural business successfully. This has beenvital to the strategy’s success, he said. It is not just in an acquisition phase that board-level HR can contribute tostrategy. Supermarket giant J Sainsbury employs 140,000 staff and is attemptingto recover lost market share. Its HR and IT director John Adshead, one of four executive directors on theboard, said, “In a strategy that is about transformation and recovery oflost ground, and trying to become the best if not the biggest supermarket,individual and team capability has to be of the highest level. HR is playing acritical role here.” While a few companies realised the importance of HR many years ago – CadburySchweppes, CMG and J Sainsbury have all had an HR director on the board formore than 20 years – many have failed to promote it to board level. Despite the strong correlation with profitability, only 16 of the 60companies which have been in the FTSE 100 since 1996 have an HR director at thetop table. This could change however, albeit slowly. George Battersby, group HRdirector and board member of biotechnology company Amersham, believes that HRdirectors are increasingly being considered for board-level positions. He said, “It will probably continue, but it is dependent on the HR rolebeing seen to add value at that level. These days, enlightened chief executivesare looking for HR directors to be strategic business partners, not justservice providers.” A key way that HR can add value in the boardroom is in assessing whether thecompany will be able to execute an ambitious business plan. Cadbury Schweppes’ Stack explained, “It is less about functional inputas being able to assess the capability of the company to implement strategy,based on the number of people, skill levels, and employee relations.” Boards are also better able to foster staff commitment if HR is representedand this can have a direct impact on productivity. Most of the HR directorsinterviewed by Personnel Today won board support for encouraging staff tobecome stakeholders in the business. “In our 21st-century company, we want all our employees to work withthe company, not for it. We have evolved the master-servant relationship, andmany staff passionately believe that the firm is theirs – 96 per cent ownshares,” explained Bell. Communication of staff issues is also important. “If the whole boardspeaks with one voice and in the same language, it is likely to come across assincere to the staff,” said Ian Taylor, HR and organisation director ofconsultancy giant CMG. But Neil Roden, HR director of Royal Bank of Scotland, questions theimportance of board level representation. He is not a board member. He said, “Our board only meets a couple of times a year and I thinkthere are more important factors for HR. The head of HR has to report to thechief executive. We have two board subcommittees where 99 per cent of the bigdecisions are taken. “Furthermore, it doesn’t matter what position the HR director holds ifthey don’t have the ability to influence the organisation.” Amersham’s Battersby agrees that HR’s ability to influence profitabilitydepends on respect, not warming a seat on the board. He said, “It isn’t essential to be on the board, but HR does have to beseen as a top player in the senior management team. The HR role cannot beperformed effectively unless you are at the heart of the business agenda.”But there are concerns that HR professionals don’t have the skills to get tothe heart of the business agenda and make a contribution. Stack, who has an HRbackground, is concerned about the trend for senior personnel roles to befilled by directors from other disciplines. He said, “While companies are starting to recognise the importance ofpeople as part of the business, they don’t have the confidence to use HR. “Wider business skills need to be identified and nurtured early in anHR career so they can progress to senior roles and influence performance.”www.andersen.com Feedbackfrom the boardWhat are the board level skillsneeded by HR to improve company profitability?John Adshead, HR and IT directorof J Sainsbury”A combination of commercial understanding, technicalskill and ability to influence others is needed to succeed at board level. Itis vital that HR develops its commercial understanding so that it knows whereincome and profits flow from.”David Bell, director for people ofPearson”It makes a big difference if you come in from outside HRbecause you have experience of being a line manager and understand the issuesinvolved in managing a large number of people.”George Battersby, HR director ofAmersham”Firstly you need commercial ability, and secondlyspecialist professional skills. There is no point in pursuing an HR agenda thatis leading edge if it is not connected to the business agenda.”Henry Fairweather, HR director ofScottish & Newcastle”While you don’t have to be a whiz kid economist oraccountant, you do need to understand the strategic vision of the business.It’s also important to be a diplomat. All organisations have tensions betweendifferent divisions and personalities, and HR is well placed to get people tosee both sides of an argument. HR can be the oil in the wheels of the seniormanagement team.”Ian Taylor, HR and organisation director of CMG”Leadership, business acumen and strong people skills arerequired. You’ve got to be a leader and say, ‘the answer is this, this is whatwe need to do, this is the direction we’re going, and this is our peoplestrategy’. The HR director needs to have a clear vision and carry the boardalong.”Bob Stack, chief human resourcesofficer of Cadbury Schweppes”You need to be a business person first. It’s important tomake the linkages between the needs between the needs of the business and theappropriate HR solution.”last_img read more

I want an HR move to a ‘good’ sector

May 12th, 2021

first_imgI want an HR move to a ‘good’ sectorOn 9 Jul 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article I work in HR in the City and am looking to move into a different industry.In your view, do different sectors have reputations for ‘good’ and ‘bad’ HR,and if so, which is which? Doug Knott, senior consultant, Chiumento This is an interesting question as it raises the issue as to what is ‘good’and ‘bad’ HR. There is no simple answer. Sophisticated leading edge HRpractices may be the right solutions for blue chips multinationals, but are notappropriate for all organisations. Having said that, good people management practices are good for businessgenerally. I do not believe that any sectoral generalisations can be drawn andthere are examples of ‘good’ and ‘bad’ HR in all sectors. Organisations with anexcellent reputation for the quality of their products and services or havesuccessfully undergone major transformations also tend to have a goodreputation for their HR. You may also want to consider a range of other issues when deciding on yournext career move. What are your values, needs, skills and competencies andwhich sectors are most likely to match these? What type of organisationalculture suits your preferred working style? Given your background and incomerequirements, what are the realistic options available to you in the employmentmarket? Jo Redgwell, consultant, Macmillan Davies Hodes I am a little surprised by your question; in my experience HR professionalsat any level or sector strive to provide the most accurate and precise serviceto their clients. There is no such thing as ‘good’ or ‘bad’ HR, but eachindustry does tailor HR to their specific sector needs because they supportdifferent groupings of individuals. You should focus on what environment is going to provide you with the mostjob satisfaction. When you are in an interview, remember it is an opportunity foryou to probe whether you want the job. So ask questions about the company andHR team, think of a situation and ask the interviewer how the company wouldresolve this issue. You will quickly know then if the company holds the samephilosophy as you. Peter Sell, joint managing director, DMS Consultancy As someone working in HR, I am surprised you expect a response to yourquestion that would be based on stereotyping and sweeping generalisations.While you can pick out certain sectors that may be described as ‘good’ or‘bad’, there will inevitably be organisations that are seen to be very goodemployers in the bad sector and bad employers in the good sector. How do you start to define good and bad? For example, the retail sector isknown to have a long hours culture and if you are supporting a 24-hour 7-dayweek operation, then those hours may be unsociable. The public sector has a reputation for lower pay compared with the private,but there are other inherent benefits. This may not have answered yourquestion, but I don’t think it is possible to do so. Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

EFA launches amnesty to tackle ageist job adverts

May 12th, 2021

first_imgEFA launches amnesty to tackle ageist job advertsOn 1 Jul 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. The Employers Forum on Age (EFA) is launching a job advertisement amnesty,encouraging people to send in examples of ageist recruitment ads. The EFA says despite the Government’s launch of a voluntary code four yearsago, it is still easy to find ageist adverts. Through the amnesty, the EFA wants to make more employers aware thatspecifying ages or using age-related language in their recruitment advertisingcan constitute age discrimination. To fulfil European legal requirements, the Government must put legislationin place banning age discrimination in employment by December 2006. In May, the EFA found adverts such as: ‘traditional secretarial support… age30s’; or ‘Young, funky and ambitious? So is this agency…’; while othersinformed applicants of a ‘salary relevant to age and experience’. Sam Mercer, director of the EFA, said: “Employers really need to focuson ability, not age. Too many ads aren’t thought through. Employers may notrealise they are putting off ideal candidates by sending out the message thatthey only want a person of a specific age. “Simply removing an age range from an advert will not protect employersfrom future age discrimination laws,” she added. “Ageist language mayalso be considered unlawful, and going by the adverts we see today, manyrecruiters will have a serious problem in three years’ time.” The Government will launch its second consultation on the legislation at theend of the month. The EFA plans to use the information gathered from the amnesty to gauge theextent of ageist adverts, and will report its findings to the Government aspart of the consultation process. By Quentin ReadeThe EFA’s top 10 watch-words in job adsWhen looking for ‘young candidates’, employers often use wordssuch as:– Lively– Ambitious– Bright– Upbeat– Funky When looking for an ‘older candidate’, they often use wordssuch as:– Mature– Dependable– Responsible– Reliable– Experience-drivenHow to make your job ads ageneutralThe EFA’s guidelines for employers state you should:– Focus on skills and competencies, not personal details– Avoid words that can be misconstrued, such as ‘mature’ or‘bright’– Make sure you can justify the amount of experience you askfor – Check any images used – do they show age diversity or arethey only going to appeal to a specific age group?– Review advertising media and location regularly to ensure youare reaching a wide range of potential applicantswww.efa.org.uk Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Comment on Is Agency recruitment going to be ‘uber-ised’? The answer here. by Fiona

May 12th, 2021

first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Fair call – appreciate your comments and views Adam… from my perspective it was just taking away from the discussion and topic; and maybe those contributions from others that I personally like to take away after reading one of Greg’s blogs.Read full article Comments are closed. Comment on Is Agency recruitment going to be ‘uber-ised’? The answer here. by FionaShared from missc on 15 Apr 2016 in Personnel Todaylast_img

Vicious cycle creates “huge supply crunch,” pushing home prices up

May 12th, 2021

first_imgTagsHousing MarketNational Association of Realtorsredfin Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Message* Full Name* The median existing-home price exceeded $300,000 for the first time last year (iStock)Homeowners aren’t budging, and it’s driving the supply of houses down — and existing-home prices up.One in four homeowners has not moved in 20 years, the Wall Street Journal reported. The analysis, conducted by real estate brokerage Redfin, found that homeowner tenure has been climbing steadily since 2005, when only 8.6 percent of homeowners had been in their homes for 20 years.Home sales in 2020 swelled to their highest level in 14 years as newly remote workers searched for more space for their families and home offices. In turn, the availability of homes has dwindled to a record low, with just a 2.3-month supply at the end of November.ADVERTISEMENTThose looking to buy homes will find few affordable options, as the demand for existing homes pushes prices up. The median existing-home price exceeded $300,000 for the first time last year, and in November reached $310,800 — a 15 percent increase from 2019, according to the National Association of Realtors.“We are in a really huge supply crunch,” Daryl Fairweather, Redfin’s chief economist, told the Journal. “It becomes a cycle where people don’t want to move because it’s so difficult to buy a home, and then that in turn makes it even more difficult to buy a home because people aren’t moving and freeing up inventory.”[WSJ] — Georgia KromreiRead moreNew home sales slide but prices are risingNew home sales hit 14-year high in AugustExisting home sales fall for first time in 5 monthscenter_img Share via Shortlink Email Address* Contact Erin Hudsonlast_img read more

TRD’s February issue is live for subscribers!

May 12th, 2021

first_img issue is live The Real Deal’s February national issue is live for digital subscribers and is about to begin hitting doorsteps around the country.As the pandemic slowly recedes, other issues are coming to the fore. In this month’s magazine we look at some controversies and cliffhangers in the industry, including:Compass’ clawbacks — where brokers have to pay back bonuses and other incentives if they decide to leaveBrookfield’s ill-fated plan to turn defunct malls into “mini cities”The SPAC frenzy that has real estate players plunging into a pile of blank checksThe $57 billion question: What if tenants never pay their rent?All Year Management’s mounting woes, including a bankruptcy battle in BrooklynSmaller cities launching incentive programs to attract talent as WFH settles inThe see-no-evil attitude of South Florida homebuyers as hurricanes, rising sea levels and insurance premiums get worse… And much more! Subscribe today and check out the new issue here.ADVERTISEMENT Share via Shortlink Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Tagslast_img read more

The status and trends of Antarctic and sub-Antarctic seabirds

May 9th, 2021

first_imgThe third review of the status and trends of Antarctic and sub-Antarctic seabird populations compiled by the Bird Biology Subcommittee of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research at the request of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) is presented.last_img

A new macroflora from the South Orkney Islands, Antarctica: evidence of an Early to Middle Jurassic age for the Powell Island Conglomerate

May 9th, 2021

first_imgA macroflora from John Peaks, Powell Island, contains Sagenopteris nilssoniana, Cladophlebis oblonga, Brachyphyllum sp., Elatocladus confertus, and Sphenopteris sp. The macroflora is best correlated with the Botany Bay Group flora, suggesting an Early to Middle Jurassic age for the Powell Island Conglomerate. This age supports new interpretations for the geological evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula that suggest the initial phase of Gondwana break-up was manifested as small rift grabens with continental deposits.last_img